Are you safe? In case of emergency, or if there is immediate danger to health or safety, call 911.

What You May be Feeling

If you or someone you know has been impacted by sexual violence, you may be experiencing a range of emotions and that's okay. No matter the circumstances or what you are feeling, remember that sexual violence is never the fault of the victim. The person who committed the act is responsible for their actions.

While no two victims or situations are exactly alike, we have compiled some information and resources that may help as you work through this difficult process. In the meantime, if someone discloses to you that they have been sexually assaulted:

  • Believe them.
  • Reassure them that it wasn't their fault.
  • Keep their disclosure confidential (unless the situation requires mandatory reporting).
  • Never pressure them for more information than they want to share.

If you are not sure where to go for help, consider contacting Family Advocates at 608.348.5995.

    • One in five women will experience rape or attempted rape in their lifetime.
    • 20 to 25% of college women are victims of forced sex during their time in college.
    • A majority of perpetrators who commit these crimes are someone the victim knows.
    • Any act of intimacy, current or past, does not give someone consent to initiate or increase sexual contact.
    • Everyone reacts to trauma differently, but here are some common reactions you or someone you know may experience:
      • Emotional—fear, anger, denial, embarrassment, depression
      • Physical—trouble sleeping, headaches, stomach problems, muscle tension
      • Social—withdrawing from friends and family, distrusting other people, fear of being in public situations
      • Academic—difficulty concentrating or focusing
    • About 1 in 6 college-aged female survivors received assistance from a victim services agency.
    • Approximately 70% of rape or sexual assault victims experience moderate to severe distress, a larger percentage than for any other violent crime.
    • Nearly two thirds of college students experience sexual harassment.

    Source: National Sexual Violence Resource Center and Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)

    • One in 71 men will experience rape or attempted rape in their lifetime.
    • 15% of college men are victims of forced sex during their time in college.
    • Male college-aged students (18-24) are 78% more likely than non-students of the same age to be a victim of rape or sexual assault.
    • A majority of perpetrators who commit these crimes are someone the victim knows.
    • Any act of intimacy, current or past, does not give someone consent to initiate or increase sexual contact.
    • Everyone reacts to trauma differently, but here are some common reactions you or someone you know may experience:
      • Emotional—fear, anger, denial, embarrassment, depression
      • Physical—trouble sleeping, headaches, stomach problems, muscle tension
      • Social—withdrawing from friends and family, distrusting other people, fear of being in public situations
      • Academic—difficulty concentrating or focusing
    • Approximately 70% of rape or sexual assault victims experience moderate to severe distress, a larger percentage than for any other violent crime.
    • Male identified survivors/victims may question their masculinity following being victimized.
    • Nearly two thirds of college students experience sexual harassment.

    Source: National Sexual Violence Resource Center and Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)

    • 21% of TGQN (transgender, genderqueer, nonconforming) college students have been sexually assaulted, compared to 18% of non-TGQN females, and 4% of non-TGQN males.
    • A majority of perpetrators who commit these crimes are someone the victim knows
    • Any act of intimacy, current or past, does not give someone consent to initiate or increase sexual contact.
    • Everyone reacts to trauma differently, but here are some common reactions you or someone you know may experience:
      • Emotional—fear, anger, denial, embarrassment, depression
      • Physical—trouble sleeping, headaches, stomach problems, muscle tension
      • Social—withdrawing from friends and family, distrusting other people, fear of being in public situations
      • Academic—difficulty concentrating or focusing
    • Approximately 70% of rape or sexual assault victims experience moderate to severe distress, a larger percentage than for any other violent crime.
    • You may fear that your sexual orientation or gender identity may be seen as the “real” issue instead of the assault.
    • You may fear you won’t be taken seriously because of your sexual orientation. You’re not required to disclose this to anyone, and even if you do disclose it, you are still entitled to the same care and safety as everyone else.

    Source: National Sexual Violence Resource Center and Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN)

  • Evidence of sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, or stalking should be preserved as soon as possible, even if you are unsure about reporting to the university or filing criminal charges. Preservation of evidence is essential for both law enforcement and campus disciplinary investigations.

    Write down, or have a friend write down, everything you can remember about the incident, including a physical description of the assailant. You should attempt to do this even if you are unsure about reporting the incident in the future.

    Preserve Forensic Evidence

    If you choose to report the assault and pursue legal options, a prompt forensic examination can be crucial.

    • Avoid drinking, bathing, showering, brushing your teeth, using mouthwash, or combing your hair.
    • Do not change clothes. If you have already changed your clothes, place your clothing and other items (sheets, blankets) in a brown paper bag (a plastic bag may destroy evidence).
    • Go to a hospital emergency department (Southwest Health Center), which has the capability to provide a Sexual Assault Forensic Exam (SAFE) or "rape kit", and medical care for victims of sexual assault and intimate partner violence. You have the right to refuse the entire exam or any part of it at any time.
    • You may also decide to complete a forensic exam anonymously.
    • If you suspect that you are the victim of a drug-facilitated sexual assault, ask the hospital or clinic where you receive medical care to take a urine sample. Drugs, such as Rohypnol and GHB, are more likely to be detected in urine than in blood. Rohypnol stays in the body for several hours and can be detected in the urine up to 72 hours after taking it. GHB leaves the body in 12 hours.

    Consider bringing someone to the hospital with you for support.

    Preserve Physical Evidence

    Physical evidence should be preserved even if you choose not to go to the hospital for a forensic exam. Save all of the clothing you were wearing at the time of the assault. Put each item in a separate paper bag (do not use plastic bags). Save all bedding (blankets, sheets) and put each in a separate paper bag. Take photographs of any visible physical injuries (bruising, scratches) for use as evidence. If you report to law enforcement, they may want to take their own photos as evidence.

    Preserve Electronic Evidence

    Texts, emails, Facebook posts, chats, pictures, videos, or other forms of electronic communication can be helpful in a college or criminal investigation. Download, save to a PDF, take screen shots, or use other methods to preserve electronic evidence.

  • Helpful tips to provide support:

    • Believe them.
    • Listen non-judgmentally and validate their feelings.
    • Assure them it’s not their fault.
    • Assure them they’re not alone.
    • Empower them. They may ask for advice; give them their options and let them decide.
    • Respect time and space for healing.
    • Ask what they need.
    • Encourage them to seek support.
    • Seek support yourself.

    What not to do:

    • More violence – when we get angry and aggressive, this may validate violence as an acceptable behavior.
    • Blame, criticize, shame them – don’t ask about their behavior, their clothes, etc.
    • Tell them what to do/offer solutions.
    • Analyze their response.
    • Interrupt or dominate the conversation.
    • Be too positive – do not say everything will be totally fine.
    • Try to ignore what happened.
  • The University of Wisconsin-Platteville takes alleged instances of sexual misconduct seriously and makes every effort to investigate these allegations. You are expected to make yourself aware of and comply with the law, and with university policies and regulations.

    You are a maturing adult, capable of making your own decisions, as well as accepting the consequences of those decisions. The student conduct process has been established to respond to incidents involving allegations of inappropriate behavior within our community.

    This process provides:

    • Educational opportunities which encourage you to evaluate your own actions
    • Opportunities to consider your own decision making
    • Help acquiring new skills to improve your choices in the future

    These resources will help you be aware of the relevant policies and procedures:

    Chapter UWS 17 - Student Nonacademic Disciplinary Procedures
    UW-Platteville Sexual Violence & Sexual Harassment Policy
    Sexual Violence & Sexual Harassment Reporting and Investigation Procedures Flowchart

    • Your friend may be experiencing a range of emotions.
    • Try to understand what has happened.
    • You may be experiencing a range of emotions, and also need to seek support.
    • Direct your friend to resources.
    • Encourage them to seek support (counseling, family, etc.)
    • Listen non-judgmentally and validate their feelings.
    • Remember that being a friend doesn’t mean approving of their actions or choices. It also does not mean acting. Violence is illegal. Retaliation is against our Sexual Violence policy.
  • The choice to report an incident of sexual violence or sexual harassment is yours. You can report to law enforcement to file a police report.

    Additionally, you can file a report with the university, and if the perpetrator is also a member of the UW-Platteville community, the situation would be managed through the appropriate adjudication process. If you are not sure of what is best for you, you can discuss your options with any of our confidential resources.

    Only 310 out of every 1,000 sexual assaults are reported to police. That means about 2 out of 3 go unreported. Of college-aged female students, only about 20% of students report to the police. (RAINN)

    For more information on reporting an incident of sexual violence or sexual harassment, please File a Report.

  • Campus Resources

    University Counseling Services
    608.342.1865
    220 Royce Hall

    Student Health Services
    608.342.1891
    216 Royce Hall

    University Police
    608.342.1584
    134 Brigham Hall

    Dean of Students Office
    608.342.1854
    2300 Markee Pioneer Student Center

    Sexual Violence Victim’s Advocate
    Paula Schoenberg
    608.778.9802
    130 Warner Hall
    Drop in hours: Mondays noon–4 p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m.–2 p.m.
    Support Group: Mondays 4–5 p.m.

    Doyle Center for Gender and Sexuality
    608.342.1453
    136 Warner Hall

    Local Resources

    Family Advocates
    608.348.5995, or the hotline 800.924.2624
    250 N Court St, Platteville, WI 53818

    Southwest Health Center/SANE Nurse
    608.348.2331, or the SANE line 608.342.4730
    1400 Eastside Rd, Platteville, WI

    Platteville City Police
    608.348.2313
    165 N. 4th St, Platteville, WI

    Riverview Center, Inc. (Dubuque)
    888.707.8155
    2600 Dodge St, Dubuque, IA

    Sate and National Resources

    Wisconsin Coalition Against Sexual Assault (WCASA)

    Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network (RAINN)

    National Sexual Assault Hotline
    800.656.4673

Contact Information

Sexual Misconduct


120 Royce Hall