MSE in Adult Education Satellite Weekend Program

UW-Platteville Adult Education graduate

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The learning needs of adults are unique due to career demands, family commitments, and life experiences which affect how they learn. The MSE adult education Weekend Program, provides advanced study to develop and enhance skills in designing, delivering, and assessing educational programs for adults.

Mission

The mission of the UW-Platteville MSE program in Adult Education is to provide high quality, accessible graduate education to students seeking to serve adults in educational and human service settings.

Meets the needs of working adults

  • Flexible format and scheduling
  • Adult Education courses are offered Friday nights and Saturdays.
  • Rotation of classes in a two-year cycle
  • Students may begin in spring, summer, or fall semester, so you can enter the program when you are ready to start
  • Face to face classes are offered in a variety of locations—currently Janesville, Milwaukee, Madison, Racine, and Platteville.
  • $450 per credit for in state and out of state students

Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Graduates recognize the unique characteristics of adult learners and clients.
  2. Graduates design and implement programs appropriate for adults.
  3. Graduates evaluate the economic, social, and political characteristics of the communities and schools in which they work.
  4. Graduates critically examine significant theories and philosophical orientations relevant to their intended work settings.
  5. Graduates evaluate research literature in their areas of interest.
  6. Graduates design and conduct independent research projects.

Financial Aid

Tuition for the MSE Adult Education Weekend Program is $450 per credit. Students officially admitted into the MSE degree program and registered for at least 5 credits per semester are eligible for financial aid. For more information, visit Financial Aid. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) must be completed; call 608.342.1836 for an application.

Textbooks and materials

MSE Adult Education Weekend Program requires students to purchase their own books prior to the start of class.  Textbook costs are not included in tuition and fees.

Library access

As a registered UW-Platteville student, you will be eligible to use Karrmann Library resources.  Karrmann Library also has more information about off-campus users.

You may also use the libraries at UW System campuses in your area (UW-Platteville student ID may be required to check out materials).

Concentrations

Students may pursue a concentration in human services or vocational technical education.

Human Services Concentration

Behavioral sciences and mental health theory focus. Inter-disciplinary program (psychology, counseling psychology, criminal justice, communication, and related disciplines). The concentration is designed to meet the educational needs of bachelor-level human services professionals who need to earn a master's degree to meet career goals and certification requirements. Combining adult education and mental health theory courses in the MSE program adds a theoretical framework to the knowledge and skills base of human services practitioners.  Additional coursework is available for those pursuing counseling licensure.

Vocational/Technical Concentration

Includes education courses meeting certification requirements for technical college faculty. Students in the program may also choose to enroll in graduate courses in their particular field of study or discipline to meet the concentration requirement, if that will be more relevant.

Course Descriptions

  • TEACHING 7000 - Research Procedures (3 cr)
    Definition of problems and issues, critical examination of the research literature, review of trends in curricula and methods, and planning of investigations including historical, descriptive (including ethnographic), and experimental.
  • TEACHING 7050 - Public Relations in School and Community (3 cr)
    Designed primarily for school personnel and other community residents. Emphasizes the importance of designing programs around the needs and problems of the school and community; considers economic, social, political characteristics of communities; methods of assessment, communication, involvement, and conflict resolution. Includes activities and programs such as bond referenda, advisory committees, volunteers, public relations, etc.; considers organization, operation, implementation, and evaluation of school/community relations programs.
  • TEACHING 7130 - Improving Instructional Effectiveness (3 cr)
    Connects principles of learning to teaching practices; demonstrates how theory can become practice; considers models of teaching that promote developmentally appropriate teaching and reflective thinking; characterizes teaching as a process of conscious decision making; helps teachers become more effective decision-makers.
  • TEACHING 7500 - Topics in Education (3 cr)
    Examines current, critical issues on the state, national, and international levels; service course in education.
  • TEACHING 7540 - Program Planning for Adults (3 cr)
    Examine program development concepts, approaches, and practices used for planning, conducting, and evaluating programs for adults. Analyze framework for identifying relationships among learner goals, content, format, setting, learning objectives, learning activities, and outcomes. Develop processes and procedures for identifying and addressing educational needs and interests. Analyze tools for managing financial and non-financial resources. Develop strategies for conducting formative and summative evaluation of program elements.
  • TEACHING 7550 - The Adult Learner (3 cr)
    Examine program development concepts, approaches, and practices used for planning, conducting, and evaluating programs for adults. Analyze framework for identifying relationships among learner goals, content, format, setting, learning objectives, learning activities, and outcomes. Develop processes and procedures for identifying and addressing educational needs and interests. Analyze tools for managing financial and non-financial resources. Develop strategies for conducting formative and summative evaluation of program elements.
  • COUNSPSY 6250 - Group Counseling (3 cr)
    This course presents the theory and applied models of structured and developmental group counseling. The emphasis is placed on learning to facilitate a gradual increase in problem-solving skills leading to wellness.
  • COUNSPSY 6630 - Intro to Professional Counseling (3 cr)
    This course is an exploration of the historical, psychological, sociological, and philosophical foundations of the helping professions. Students explore basic theories, concepts, research, and skills associated with school and community counseling, as well as various roles and responsibilities assumed by the professional counselor. Emphasis is on important legal, professional, and ethical issues.
  • COUNSPSY 7070 - Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 cr)
    An introductory course designed to examine the philosophical bases, processes, and issues surrounding predominant counseling theories and techniques.
  • COUNSPSY 7080 - Career Counseling (3 cr)
    This core course is designed to prepare students for counseling in the area of career and life planning. Focus will be on increasing students' knowledge of career development theories, career assessment instruments, career resources, and job search strategies. Career and life planning will be conceptualized from a holistic perspective; thus theories and skills will be integrated into personal counseling process and placed in social, familial, cultural, and developmental contexts.
  • COUNSPSY 7190 - Multicultural Counseling and Education (3 cr)
    This graduate course is intended to help students further their Multicultural Counseling Competencies as defined by the American Counseling Association in the context of clinically working with clients as well as with students in a variety of settings. The first half of the semester focuses on the influence given to counselors and educators, the development of racial/ethnic identity of all people, microaggressions, and the implementation of culturally appropriate counseling/educating practices. The second half of the semester focuses on different racial/ethnic groups as well as on women's psychological development, LGBTQ issues, and working with the elderly.
  • COUNSPSY 7230 - Family and Couples Counseling (3 cr)
    This graduate-level course is designed to help students gain knowledge of the concepts relative to family and couples counseling. Additionally, students will begin to develop counseling techniques necessary to work with families and couples. Therefore, theory and research, as well as practice are emphasized.
  • CRIMLJUS 6630 - Current Topics in Criminal Justice (3 cr)
    Current issues in criminal justice that may not warrant a permanent course. Course content will be announced each time the course is presented.
  • CRIMLJUS 6830 - Psychopharmacology for AODA Counselors (3 cr)
    The effects of nutrients, additives, and psychoactive drugs on criminal behavior; the process by which behavior is affected by these substances. This course fulfills part of the knowledge base for AODA counselor certification.
  • PSYCHLGY 6930-Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy (3 cr)
    Survey of procedures used by psychologists, including counseling, psychotherapy, and limited psychodiagnostics. Practice procedures and applications are also emphasized.
  • PSYCHLGY 7010 - Assessment and Diagnosis of Psychopathology (3 cr)
    A practitioner-oriented seminar course designed to teach students the efficient use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) in assessing and diagnosis of the more prevalent psychological and substance abuse disorders. The format consists of experiential exercises, case conceptualizations, class and group discussions, library research, and lecture.

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