Management, Gender and Race

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Course Number: BUSADMIN 3340
Course Name: Management, Gender and Race (Online)
Course Description:    This course reviews the changing nature of management and explains why gender and race/ethnicity have become important considerations in business. It examines the status of women and people of color in managerial or administrative positions and discusses socialization processes, stereotypes, equal employment opportunity laws, illegal harassment, and power in organizations. Networking, mentoring, work/life balance, and career planning also are addressed.
Prerequisites:    BUSADMIN 2330 or AGINDUS 1500 or junior standing
Level: Undergraduate
Credits: 3
Format: Online  (This course is also offered in print.)
Program: BS in Business Administration
BS in Criminal Justice

Registration Instructions

NOTE: The information below is representative of the course and is subject to change.  The specific details of the course will be available in the Desire2Learn course instance for the course in which a student registers.

Additional Information

Learning Outcomes

  • Explain major reasons why diverse populations of women and people of color still are under-represented in top management positions in the United States to someone who is unaware of challenges that members of such groups encounter.
  • Explain strategies women and people of color who wish to become upper level executives in major U.S. corporations have used to cope with or overcome challenges they face in achieving that goal to someone who is unfamiliar with the nature of their struggle.
  • Explain the general provisions of equal opportunity laws and regulations designed to assist women and people of color in the United States to a person who has little knowledge of them.
  • Examine ways in which stereotypes and socialization processes in the United States and in your background may have affected your attitude toward and society’s perceptions of women and people of color who wish to become leaders and/or excel in managerial careers.
  • Assess the effectiveness of recommended actions to help individuals successfully manage work and family roles in your own or in a friend’s life.
  • Create a plan that a real or hypothetical organization could adopt to help employees effectively manage work and family roles.
  • Apply knowledge of challenges that women and people of color face in management to suggest alternatives and possible solutions to real or hypothetical problems involving issues related to gender and/or race or ethnicity.
  • Assess an organization’s actions designed to support employees who are women and aid in their career advancement.

    Additional Outcome for Graduate Students

  • Prepare and systematically analyze an original case study dealing with at least three issues affecting people of color or women who aspire to upper level management positions within U.S. organizations.

Unit Descriptions

Unit 1: Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Social Class in the U.S. Workplace: Overview and Introduction
Unit 1 sets the stage for the rest of the course by defining basic terms such as race, ethnicity, gender, and social class and exploring their implications in the U.S. workplace. You will learn that “Hispanic” is a government-coined term to describe people of various ethnicities and countries of origin and that people so classified can be of different races. You will study approaches to race that have been dubbed constructionist and structural along with concepts such as prejudice, racism, and individual and institutional discrimination. In addition, the concept of unearned privilege and negative consequences of the colorblind ideology, which has been engrained in many whites since childhood as a positive response to racism, will be discussed.

You will begin to learn about challenges facing women and people of color in the workplace such as glass and concrete ceilings, glass escalators, exclusion from informal interpersonal networks, and discriminatory compensation discrepancies. Incidents presented for analysis will give you the opportunity to apply material learned to devise effective alternatives for dealing with issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, and class in real or hypothetical organizations.

Unit 2: From Equal Employment Opportunity to Workforce Diversity to Inclusion
Actions for 'Unit 2: From Equal Employment Opportunity to Workforce Diversity to Inclusion

Laws, programs, and regulations that provided a baseline for equal employment opportunity in the United States are discussed in the Unit 2 Commentary. The goal of these protocols was to stop overt and subtle employment discrimination and to try to make amends, in a small way, for past workplace and societal injustices to women, people of color, and other groups. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Executive Order 11246, a groundbreaking law and presidential edict affecting women and people of color who wish to advance in management careers, are covered in this unit.

Nondiscrimination is necessary, but not sufficient, for employees to flourish. A huge difference exists between being tolerated and being accepted in the workplace. Due to a convergence of economic and other trends, diversity management, which emphasized the latter, emerged in the late 1980s. More recently, it has evolved to focus on inclusion, which welcomes, embraces, and fully supports each employee as a human being. Diversity management and inclusion are examined in Unit 2.


Unit 3: Women and People of Color in Management and Leadership Positions: Progress and Challenges
Stereotypes and socialization processes can be powerful influences on not only self-perceptions and individuals’ own careers but also the decisions they make. Such decisions include people’s qualifications for leadership positions and whether or not they would be a good “fit” for top management. In this unit, the impact of these processes will be explored. The age-old question of whether women or men are better leaders and whether the leadership styles they use tend to be similar or different will be addressed.

Socialization and stereotypes also affect the way employees and managers deal with non-work responsibilities. This unit covers advantages and drawbacks of the major U.S. federal law on such topics, the Family and Medical Leave Act. Actions organizations can take to address additional challenges of employees desiring career advancement while fulfilling care-giving and other responsibilities outside of work also are discussed.

Unit 4: Illegal Harassment based on Race, Ethnicity and Gender
This unit describes the challenges experienced by women and people of color who wish to advance in management careers and strategies for overcoming them. More words are devoted to explaining barriers than to elaborating on ways to effectively deal with them. That may be because a thorough understanding of problems and their root causes is prerequisite to development of alternatives for solving them.

Though assigned articles in the Paludi text seem to be written to apply to all women and some issues are common to most, others differ markedly based on race, ethnicity, and other factors . In general, women of color face more obstacles that are more difficult to overcome than white women. White women are privileged based on race, though some are unaware of this, and others deny it.

Factors facilitating success of African American or Black, Asian American, American Indian women and Latinas need much more extensive study, but some seem to differ between women of color, as a group, and white women. In this unit, you will also learn about managerial and organizational actions designed to make corporate women even more successful in leadership positions in the future.

Unit 5: Stereotypes, Socialization, and the Work/Life Interface
Stereotypes and socialization processes can be powerful influences on not only self-perceptions and individuals’ own careers but also the decisions they make. Such decisions include people’s qualifications for leadership positions and whether or not they would be a good “fit” for top management. In this unit, the impact of these processes will be explored. The age-old question of whether women or men are better leaders and whether the leadership styles they use tend to be similar or different will be addressed.

Socialization and stereotypes also affect the way employees and managers deal with non-work responsibilities. This unit covers advantages and drawbacks of the major U.S. federal law on such topics, the Family and Medical Leave Act. Actions organizations can take to address additional challenges of employees desiring career advancement while fulfilling care-giving and other responsibilities outside of work also are discussed.

Exams:  5 unit quizzes

Assignments: 

Quizzes Maximum Point Values
Unit 1 (Covers Unit 1 Lesson 1 and Unit 1 Lesson 2) 20 points
Unit 2 20 points
Unit 3 20 points
Unit 4 20 points
Unit 5 (Covers Unit 5 Lesson 1 and Unit 5 Lesson 2) 20 points
Quiz Subtotal 100 points
Lesson Assignments  
Unit 1 Lesson 1 10 points
Unit 1 Lesson 2 15 points
Unit 2 15 points
Unit 3 25 points
Unit 4 10 points
Unit 5 Lesson 1 15 points
Unit 5 Lesson 2 20 points
Lesson Subtotal 110 points
Discussions and Group Case Analysis  
Unit 1, Lesson 1 Discussion 5 points
Units 2, 3, and 5 Discussions 30 points (10 points each)
Unit 4 Group Case Analysis 30 points
Discussion & Group Case Analysis Subtotal 65 points
Final Assessment Project 200 points
Total Points 475 points


Grading Scale:

Final course grades will be determined as follows:
At least 93% of total possible points = A
90-92% of total possible points = A-
87-89% of total possible points= B+
83-86% of total possible points = B
80-82% of total possible points = B-
77-79% of total possible points = C+
73-76% of total possible points = C
70-72% of total possible points = C-
67-69% of total possible points = D+
60-66% of total possible points = D
<60% of total possible points = F
(Grades of A+ and D- are not allowed.)

 

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