Management, Gender and Race

Course Number: BUSADMIN 5340
Course Name: Management, Gender and Race (Online)
Course Description:    This course reviews the changing nature of management and explains why gender and race/ethnicity have become important considerations in business. It examines the status of women and people of color in managerial or administrative positions and discusses socialization processes, stereotypes, equal employment opportunity laws, illegal harassment, and power in organizations. Networking, mentoring, work/life balance, and career planning also are addressed.
Prerequisites:    None
Level: Graduate
Credits: 3
Format: Online
Program:

Master of Science in Project Management
Master of Science in Criminal Justice

Registration Instructions

NOTE: The information below is representative of the course and is subject to change.  The specific details of the course will be available in the Desire2Learn course instance for the course in which a student registers.

Additional Information

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, you should be able to

  • Explain major reasons why diverse populations of women and people of color still are under-represented in top management positions in the United States to someone who is unaware of challenges that members of such groups encounter.
  • Explain strategies women and people of color who wish to become upper level executives in major U.S. corporations have used to cope with or overcome challenges they face in achieving that goal to someone who is unfamiliar with the nature of their struggle.
  • Explain the general provisions of equal opportunity laws and regulations designed to assist women and people of color in the United States to a person who has little knowledge of them.
  • Examine ways in which stereotypes and socialization processes in the United States and in your background may have affected your attitude toward and society’s perceptions of women and people of color who wish to become leaders and/or excel in managerial careers.
  • Assess the effectiveness of recommended actions to help individuals successfully manage work and family roles in your own or in a friend’s life.
  • Create a plan that a real or hypothetical organization could adopt to help employees effectively manage work and family roles.
  • Apply knowledge of challenges that women and people of color face in management to suggest alternatives and possible solutions to real or hypothetical problems involving issues related to gender and/or race or ethnicity.
  • Assess an organization’s actions designed to support employees who are women and aid in their career advancement.

    Additional Outcome for Graduate Students

  • Prepare and systematically analyze an original case study dealing with at least three issues affecting people of color or women who aspire to upper level management positions within U.S. organizations.

Unit Descriptions
Course Organization and Assignment Descriptions

Unit 1: Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Social Class in the U.S. Workplace: Overview and Introduction
Overview
Unit 1 sets the stage for the rest of the course by defining basic terms such as race, ethnicity, gender, and social class and exploring their implications in the U.S. workplace. You will learn that “Hispanic” is a government-coined term to describe people of various ethnicities and countries of origin and that people so classified can be of different races. You will study approaches to race that have been dubbed constructionist and structural along with concepts such as prejudice, racism, and individual and institutional discrimination. In addition, the concept of unearned privilege and negative consequences of the colorblind ideology, which has been engrained in many whites since childhood as a positive response to racism, will be discussed.

You will begin to learn about challenges facing women and people of color in the workplace such as glass and concrete ceilings, glass escalators, exclusion from informal interpersonal networks, and discriminatory compensation discrepancies. Incidents presented for analysis will give you the opportunity to apply material learned to devise effective alternatives for dealing with issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, and class in real or hypothetical organizations.

Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, you should be able to

  • Explain the effects of the constructs of race, gender, and social class on the workforce participation and aspiration of women and people of color* in the United States.
  • Assess the concept of unearned privilege as if you were a majority group member OR as if you were a member of a social minority (required article).
  • Apply concepts related to ethnicity to a real or hypothetical workplace incident (Ch. 6 Byrd).
  • Evaluate myths about the gender-based pay gap in the United States and the refutations of these myths (National Committee on Pay Equity website - required reading).
  • Explain alternatives an organization could consider to effectively address classism in a real or hypothetical organization (Ch. 8 Byrd).

Unit 2: From Equal Employment Opportunity to Workforce Diversity to Inclusion
Overview

Laws, programs, and regulations that provided a baseline for equal employment opportunity in the United States are discussed in the Unit 2 Commentary. The goal of these protocols was to stop overt and subtle employment discrimination and to try to make amends, in a small way, for past workplace and societal injustices to women, people of color, and other groups. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Executive Order 11246, a groundbreaking law and presidential edict affecting women and people of color who wish to advance in management careers, are covered in this unit.

Nondiscrimination is necessary, but not sufficient, for employees to flourish. A huge difference exists between being tolerated and being accepted in the workplace. Due to a convergence of economic and other trends, diversity management, which emphasized the latter, emerged in the late 1980s. More recently, it has evolved to focus on inclusion, which welcomes, embraces, and fully supports each employee as a human being. Diversity management and inclusion are examined in Unit 2.

Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, you should be able to

  • Explain the basic provisions of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to someone who knows nothing about them (Commentary, Ch. 1 and Ch. 12 Byrd; Ch. 12 Vol. 1 Paludi ).
  • Explain four differences between Executive Order 11246 and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Commentary).
  • Explain four crucial steps in developing an affirmative action plan in employment to someone with no knowledge of affirmative action or equal employment opportunity issues (Executive Order 11246 and Affirmative Action Reading).
  • Justify your beliefs about whether or not affirmative action plans in employment should be continued in the United States based on logical arguments (Executive Order 11246 and Affirmative Action Reading).
  • Explain what workforce diversity is and is not (Ch. 1 Byrd).
  • Restate six challenges of World Class Diversity as identified as part of “trend three” in Table 1.1 of Ch. 1 of the Byrd text.
  • Restate 10 economic benefits of a diverse workplace (Ch. 1 Byrd).
  • In a real or hypothetical situation, apply what you learned in Ch. 12 of the Byrd text to decide whether dress codes, appearance policies, and bans on self-expression through clothing and personal adornment violate Title VII of the Civil Rights Act.
  • Explain how Title VII of the Civil Rights Act applies to immutable characteristics associated with race and color (Ch. 12 Byrd).
  • Evaluate the quality of an organization’s initiatives dealing with diversity and inclusion as represented on its website, based on what you learned in this unit.
  • Justify reasons for agreeing or disagreeing with findings about gender-based pay inequity in the United States and recommendations for reducing it (Ch. 7 Paludi)

Unit 3: Women and People of Color in Management and Leadership Positions: Progress and Challenges
Overview
This unit describes the challenges experienced by women and people of color who wish to advance in management careers and strategies for overcoming them. More words are devoted to explaining barriers than to elaborating on ways to effectively deal with them. That may be because a thorough understanding of problems and their root causes is prerequisite to development of alternatives for solving them.

Though assigned articles in the Paludi text seem to be written to apply to all women and some issues are common to most, others differ markedly based on race, ethnicity, and other factors. In general, women of color face more obstacles that are more difficult to overcome than white women. White women are privileged based on race, though some are unaware of this, and others deny it.

Factors facilitating success of African American or Black, Asian American, American Indian women and Latinas need much more extensive study, but some seem to differ between women of color, as a group, and white women. In this unit, you will also learn about managerial and organizational actions designed to make corporate women even more successful in leadership positions in the future.

Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, you should be able to

  • Explain the individual barriers women face when their managers are deciding to promote them to leadership positions (Vol. 1 Ch. 6 Paludi text pages 113-114).
  • Restate the authors’ “overall answer” to the question about how leaders or managers who are women behave in managerial positions compared to their male counterparts (Vol. 1 Ch. 6 Paludi text page 114).
  • Restate the benefits of mentoring and interpersonal social networking to women seeking to advance in leadership positions (Vol. 1 Ch. 6 Paludi text pages 115-116).
  • Explain how equal employment opportunity, affirmative action, and other policies; the use of developmental assignments; mentoring opportunities; and the placement of women in specific functions and locations affect the glass ceiling (Vol. 1 Ch. 6 Paludi text pages 115-119).
  • Explain to someone with no knowledge of challenges women face pursuing leadership positions how education, deliberate provision of opportunities for women to succeed, and transparency in organizational policies can help break the glass ceiling (Vol. 1 Ch. 6 Paludi text pages 126-127).
  • Justify whether you would prefer to have mentors, sponsors, or both in the next phase of your career, and explain how you might obtain them (Required video clips featuring Hewlett and Murphy or transcripts in Appendix F.)
  • Explain how dead-end jobs and different performance standards hinter women’s ability to advance into leadership positions (Vol. 2 Ch. 3 Paludi text pages 57-59 and 71-72).
  • Identify specific recommendations for promoting gender equality in upper management at these three levels:  government, societal, and national; institutional; individual (Vol. 2 Ch. 3 Paludi text pages 76-79; Table 3.3).
  • Explain five factors contributing to the miasma which African American women tend to experience in the workplace (Required unit reading: Challenges to women of color…).

Unit 4: Illegal Harassment based on Race, Ethnicity and Gender
Overview
This unit describes the challenges experienced by women and people of color who wish to advance in management careers and strategies for overcoming them. More words are devoted to explaining barriers than to elaborating on ways to effectively deal with them. That may be because a thorough understanding of problems and their root causes is prerequisite to development of alternatives for solving them.

Though assigned articles in the Paludi text seem to be written to apply to all women and some issues are common to most, others differ markedly based on race, ethnicity, and other factors. In general, women of color face more obstacles that are more difficult to overcome than white women. White women are privileged based on race, though some are unaware of this, and others deny it.

Factors facilitating success of African American or Black, Asian American, American Indian women and Latinas need much more extensive study, but some seem to differ between women of color, as a group, and white women. In this unit, you will also learn about managerial and organizational actions designed to make corporate women even more successful in leadership positions in the future.

Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, you should be able to

  • Explain how the perception of the receiver of unwanted sexual attention and the alleged harasser’s intent are considered in determining whether or not illegal harassment occurred (Commentary).
  • Explain the circumstances under which employers can avoid liability for illegal sexual harassment according to the affirmative defense as stated in the U.S. Supreme Court case, Faragher v. City of Boca Raton. (Commentary).
  • Explain five steps a real or hypothetical organization should take to deal with sexual, racial, or other harassment effectively (Commentary).
  • Prepare an effective policy on workplace romantic relationships in a real or hypothetical organization (Commentary).
  • Identify the four main elements that are critical for sexual harassment to occur based on the four factor (integrated) model of sexual harassment (Ch. 5 Vol. 1 Paludi).
  • Identify and explain the two models (of five) that support contra-power sexual harassment (Ch. 5 Vol. 1 Paludi).
  • Identify 10 categories of transgender microaggressions in the workplace (pp. 235 – 238 in Ch. 10 Vol. 2 Paludi).
  • Restate several examples supporting the unfortunate fact that racial harassment still occurs in the workplace to those who believe it no longer exists (Ch. 14 Byrd).
  • Restate three recommendations for employees who are racially harassed or who witness such harassment in the workplace (Ch. 14 Byrd).
  • Analyze a racial harassment incident in a real organization, develop feasible alternatives, and justify one as the preferred solution (Commentary, Ch. 14 Byrd, video clip).
  • Explain what is meant by “moving from diversity training to diversity education to someone who lacks knowledge of issues related to racial discrimination and harassment (Ch. 14 Byrd).

Unit 5: Stereotypes, Socialization, and the Work/Life Interface
Overview
Stereotypes and socialization processes can be powerful influences on not only self-perceptions and individuals’ own careers but also the decisions they make. Such decisions include people’s qualifications for leadership positions and whether or not they would be a good “fit” for top management. In this unit, the impact of these processes will be explored. The age-old question of whether women or men are better leaders and whether the leadership styles they use tend to be similar or different will be addressed.

Socialization and stereotypes also affect the way employees and managers deal with non-work responsibilities. This unit covers advantages and drawbacks of the major U.S. federal law on such topics, the Family and Medical Leave Act. Actions organizations can take to address additional challenges of employees desiring career advancement while fulfilling care-giving and other responsibilities outside of work also are discussed.

Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, you should be able to

  • Identify and debunk (disprove) at least ONE stereotype about two groups that differ based on race, gender, and/or ethnicity either by finding research studies that contradict it OR by giving three specific examples showing that it was false.
  • Examine the impact, if any, of your gender role socialization (or that of a friend) on choices you (or your friend) made with respect to career, family, and organizational advancement.
  • Explain ways in which the persistent stereotype associating management/leadership with males/masculinity might affect a specific woman you know who is considering a management career or who is a manager.
  • Prepare a presentation to the Board of Directors of an organization for which you are a consultant justifying the need for stereotype reduction training for top tier selection decision makers as part of a long term plan to increase the percent of women and people of color in upper level management in the firm.
  • Develop and justify a proposal for a work/life or work/family program in a real or hypothetical organization, considering economic factors, such as cost, and the need to recruit and retain a diverse workforce.

Unit 6: Graduate Component: Creation of an Original Case Study and Analysis
Outcomes
Upon completion of this unit, you should be able to

  • Apply your knowledge of issues related to gender, race, and ethnicity in management and in the workplace to create an original case study dealing with those issues in a real or hypothetical organization.
  • Analyze a case study according to a systematic process.

Grading Criteria for Activities

Assignments Possible Points
Quizzes  
Unit 1 (Unit 1 Lesson 1 & Unit 1 Lesson 2) 20 points
Unit 2 20 points
Unit 3 20 points
Unit 4 20 points
Unit 5 (Unit 5 Lesson 1 & Unit 5 Lesson 2) 20 points
Quiz Subototal: 100 points
Lesson Assignments  
Unit 1 Lesson 1 10 points
Unit 1 Lesson 2 15 points
Unit 2 15 points
Unit 3 25 points
Unit 4 10 points
Unit 5 Lesson 1 15 points
Unit 5 Lesson 2 20 points
Lesson Subtotal: 110 points
Discussions and Group Case Analysis  
Unit 1 Lesson 1 Discussion 5 points
Unit 2, 3 & 5 Discussions (3 @ 10 pts. each) 30 points
Unit 4 Group Case Anaylsis 30 points
Discussion and Group Case Analysis Subtotal: 65 points
Final Assessment Project 200 points
Original Case Study (Graduate Students Only) 150 points
Total: 625 points

Grading Scale
A 93% - 100%
A- 90% - 92%
B+ 87% - 89%
B 83% - 86%
B- 80% - 82%
C+ 77% - 79%
C 73% - 76%
C- 70% - 72%
D+ 67% - 69%
D 60% - 66%
F 0% - 59%

Grades of A+ and D- are not allowed.

Footer Anchor