History of the US Since 1877

Course Number: HISTORY 1430
Course Name: History of the U.S. Since 1877 (Online)
Course Description:    Continuation of a general survey of American history based on major social, political and economic developments from the Reconstruction to the present.
Prerequisites:    None
Level: Undergraduate
Credits: 3
Format: Online
Program: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

Registration Instructions

NOTE: The information below is representative of the course and is subject to change.  The specific details of the course will be available in the Desire2Learn course instance for the course in which a student registers.

Additional Information

Learning Outcomes
Upon completion of this course, you should be able to

  • Communicate historical knowledge, interpretations, and arguments clearly and critically in writing and discussion.
  • Analyze connections between the past and present.
  • Interpret sources of historical changes and movements.
  • Demonstrate a knowledge of American history from Reconstruction to the 1970s.

Unit Descriptions

Unit 1: The Politics and Culture of the Industrializing Nation, 1865-1929
Overview

The end of the Civil War in 1865 set the stage for accelerated industrialization of the United States with the North joined by the South and West. The heart of the Second Industrial Revolution was the North, where the majority of native-born Americans and immigrants worked in factories. Reconstruction in the South, westward settlements of white and black Americans in the West, and Americanization of some Native Americans incorporated the South and West into the industrializing nation. This rapid industrialization mobilized heretofore marginalized groups such as farmers and workers, as well as middle-class reformers in their organized movements to address the social and cultural ills and changes brought on by the industrialization. During this period, America also witnessed domestic and international struggles to adjust boundaries of freedom, liberty, and pursuit of happiness by becoming an imperial nation, solidifying racial segregation at home, and waging culture wars against what many native-born Americans viewed as foreign elements in the United States.

The reading of the narrative textbook, GML, with chapter quiz and video lectures will introduce students to the key concepts, descriptions of peoples, ideas, and movements, and in-depth knowledge of historical events. The discussion textbook, TTP, and supplementary documents and videos will encourage students to evaluate primary sources as well as historians' arguments.

Unit 2: The Politics and Culture of New Deal America, 1930-1970
Overview

The Great Depression legitimized the federal government's active interventions into the various aspects of American lives. Spearheaded by the New Deal and then expanded by subsequent welfare programs, the era of laissez-faire was supplanted by the government regulation, protection, and guarantee of rights and entitlements. The international leadership of the United States during the Second World War and Cold War rendered harsh realities of various forms of inequalities and lofty rhetoric of democracy and freedom at odds. The civil rights movements struggled to finish what Reconstruction had started by challenging racial segregation and discrimination. While student activists, feminists, and anti-war protesters presented radical critique of the mainstream American culture and politics, the counterculture movements rejected them. The increasing U.S. interventions into Vietnam further fragmented American society and undermined the country's credibility as the sentinel of freedom at home and abroad.

The reading of the narrative textbook (GML) with chapter quiz and video lectures will introduce students to the key concepts, descriptions of peoples, ideas, and movements, and in-depth knowledge of historical events. The discussion textbook (TTP) and supplementary document or video will encourage students to evaluate primary sources as well as historians' arguments.

Grading Criteria for Activities

Assignment Possible Points
GML Chapter Quiz 100 points
GML Video Lecture Essay 100 points
Supplementary Essay 100 points
TTP Discussion 100 points
Midterm Exam 100 points
Final Exam 100 points
Comparative Book Review & Research Paper 100 points
Total: 700 points

Grading Scale

A 630 - 700 points
B 560 - 629 points
C 490 - 559 points
D 420 - 489 points
F 0 - 420 points

 

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