Control Systems Engineering

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Course Number: ENGRG 7310
Course Name: Control Systems Engineering (Online)
Course Description:    This course is intended as a first semester graduate course designed for distance education. It covers the basics for building a practical control system incorporating a microcontroller or PLC. Basic electronics, logic, programming for microprocessors and PLC's, fractional horsepower motors, and sensors will be introduced. Control theory implementing electro-mechanical systems will be reviewed. P: consent of instructor.
Prerequisites:    None
Level: Graduate
Credits: 3
Format: Online

Registration Instructions

NOTE: The information below is representative of the course and is subject to change.  The specific details of the course will be available in the Desire2Learn course instance for the course in which a student registers.

Additional Information

Learning Outcomes

The course is the first of three series in the Control Systems Engineering curriculum for the University of Wisconsin Platteville masters degree program.
The introduction to the use of Classical Control theory and practice of control systems engineering is made.

Topics covered and objectives are each are as follows:

  • Introduction to terms, applications and design objectives used in the control systems engineering discipline.   
  • Modeling of open loop systems using frequency response techniques.
  • The Laplace transform  technique is reviewed and the term transfer function  is developed for linear, time-invariant electrical, mechanical and electromechanical systems.
  • System analysis or finding and describing the output response of a system.
  • Ttime response from  transfer functions as well as using poles and zeros to determine control response.
  • Use of 1st and 2nd order systems will be evaluated.
  • Nonlinearity with time response systems will be reviewed.
  • Representation and  reduction of systems formed of inner-connected open-loop subsystems.
  • Basic concepts for stability, transient response and steady-state error analysis.
  • Use of Nyquist and Bode plot methods for evaluations.
  • Design of compensators viewed from the point of sinusoidal frequency techniques

Unit Descriptions

Unit 1:

Chapter 1 is the introduction to terms, applications and design objectives used in the control systems engineering discipline.

Chapter 2 covers the modeling of open loop systems using frequency response techniques.  The Laplace transform technique is reviewed and the term transfer function is developed for linear, time-invariant electrical, mechanical and electromechanical systems.

Chapter 4 deals with system analysis or finding and describing the output response of a system.  Included are time response from  transfer function  as well as using poles and zeros to determine control response.  Use of 1st and 2nd order systems will be evaluated.  Finally, nonlinearity with time response systems will be reviewed.

Chapter 5 discusses the representation and reduction of systems formed of inner-connected open-loop subsystems. NISE remarks that Chapter 5 could come before Chapter 4 based on the open-loop sequence however the student seeing the application of the study of system representation, the higher level of understanding there is.

Unit 2:

Chapter 6 covers the study of stability of transfer functions and the Routh-Hurwitz criterion is implemented.

Chapter 7 will suggest how to evaluate steady-state errors for unity and non-unity feedback systems as well as suggested error performance.  Also covered are disturbance inputs and how to design system parameters to meet specific steady-state specifications.

Chapter 8 covers the transient response of higher-order systems using root locus techniques.  

Chapter 9 covers the design of compensators and controllers using the root locus.

Unit 3:

Chapter 10 covers basic concepts for stability, transient response and steady-state error analysis.   Included are the use of Nyquist and Bode plot methods for evaluations.

Chapter 11 covers the design of compensators viewed from the point of sinusoidal frequency techniques.

Grading Information

The final grade will be based upon a straight scale:
A = 90 - 100%
B = 80 - 89%
C = 70 - 79%
D = 60 - 69%
F  <  60%

The instructor reserves the right to raise or lower any student's score. The breakdown is as follows:
Review Questions  10%
Homework Questions 30%
Exams 45%
Design Project Questions 15%
Total 100%
Breakdowns in each section are equally weighted; so for example there are 3 exams each weighted 15% of the total grade.

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