Humanities

http://www.uwplatt.edu/humanities

Department Chair: Carmen Faymonville
Office: 349 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608-342-1826
E-mail: faymonvc@uwplatt.edu

Majors:

English Majors:
Literature major
English Education major
Professional Writing major
Teaching-Writing major
English Minors
English Non-teaching minor
English Education minor
Language Arts minor
Creative Writing Minor
Teaching English as a second or Other Language minor
Certificate in English Writing
Philosophy Major
Philosophy Minor
Foreign Languages Majors:
German major
German Education major
Spanish major
Spanish Education major
Foreign Languages Minorss:
German minor
German education minor
Spanish minor
Spanish education minor
French minor
French Education minor
Certificate in Foreign Languages

About The Department & Major

The Department of Humanities at UW-Platteville offers the student an interdisciplinary ?eld of study. As an academic ?eld, the Humanities focus upon understanding the human condition through the contemplation and practice of the Liberal Arts. Students cannot major in the Humanities as such but only separately in English, Philosophy, and Foreign Languages. The purpose of the study of the humanities is to explore the diversity of human thought and experience. Humanities courses teach students to contemplate and confront fundamental questions about reality, knowledge, justice, and beauty. Our programs in English, Philosophy, and Foreign Languages challenge students to explore a diversity of approaches to learning and life. Complementary minors in these ?elds are also available for students who seek to add a concentration in the Humanities to any major they may have chosen. The Humanities form a ?eld of study that does not automatically prepare for a career track (except in education) but prepares the student for a variety of job skills. Humanities graduates primarily ?nd jobs in business, government, free-lancing environments, communication and publishing, teaching, and other employment sectors. Many students choose a major in one of the Humanities programs in order to lay an excellent foundation for graduate school (M.A. and PhD), including advanced degrees in English, Foreign Languages, and Philosophy but also for law school, Communication Studies and careers in Student Services, profit organizations, and humanitarian sectors. A majority of the Humanities courses satisfy the university general education requirement. Students are also encouraged to participate in cultural life through a student-led Humanities Club, membership in Alt.Arts, which publishes a literary magazine and schedules poetry readings and other performances. Students in the Humanities also gain valuable experience from participation in exchanges with local and international schools, particularly the Nagasaki Program (Japan), presentations at academic conferences and professional organizations, as well as study-abroad programs.

Graduates with a degree in any of the Humanities programs will have the following abilities and competencies:

English

http://www.uwplatt.edu/humanities/english.html

Department Chair: Carmen Faymonville
Office: 349 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608-342-1826
E-mail: faymonvc@uwplatt.edu
Professors:
Stephanie Branson (on leave 2004-2006)
Gloria S. Stephenson
V. John Vacca
Associate Professors:
Teresa Burns
Dennis Ciesielski
Martha Drummond
Carmen Faymonville
Peter Hadorn
Thomas Hickey
Kathleen Tigerman
Deborah Kinder (Emerita)
Assistant Professors:
Deborah Gillespie
Stormy Stipe
Lecturers:
Rebecca Gottlieb
John Grauer
Rory Holscher
Catherine Huff-VanPaemel
Sheila Kelly
Harry Kronick
Thomas Nordgren
Wendy Perkins
Peter Saiz
John Soley
Stephen Shepherd

About The Department & Major

Our English Program allows students the flexibility to choose from the following three English majors and five minors according to individual preference and career choices. Students may also obtain a Writing Certificate.

Literature Major (36 credits)

This classic English Major prepares the student for careers and graduate work in English, law, publishing, library science, government, business, and other professions.

English Education Major (36 credits)

In cooperation with the School of Education, this traditional English major prepares students for Middle/Secondary Education careers (Early Adolescence Through Adolescence, Ages 10-21).

Professional Writing Major (36 credits)

This major prepares students for careers in a variety of writing ?elds, including journalism, publishing, technical communication, editing, and communication.

English Non-Teaching Minor (24 credits)

This minor is designed for students who seek expertise in literature and writing for a variety of purposes and career options as a complement to their major in another program

English Education Minor (24 credits)

This minor is designed for students seeking Middle/Secondary Education certi?cation. It complements other teaching majors and quali?es the student to teach another subject.

Language Arts Minor (26 credits)

Designed for Education majors.

Teaching English As A Second Or Other Language (TESL) Minor (24 credits)

This minor is not only for English Education Majors. It also prepares students who are not enrolled in the School of Education programs for teaching non-native speakers in a variety of contexts. Students ?nd employment at private and public schools as well as abroad at the secondary and postsecondary level.

Creative Writing Minor (24 credits)

This versatile minor focuses on the development of literary writing skills particularly in poetry, short story, non-?ction, and other professional genres.

Writing Certificate (18 Credits)

Designed for students who want a general education in English Studies and Writing but do not wish to major or minor in English.

Mission Statement:

All English majors and minors are designed to prepare students for writing and teaching careers in a variety of professional environments, in which creativity, critical thinking, and a broad cultural perspective are required. English courses teach pro?ciency in literary analysis, professional and creative writing, cultural analysis and creation, and the mastery of rhetorical devices. The English computer-writing classroom in 104 Boebel Hall allows students access to up-to-date computer technology.

The basic pre-professional objective of the non-teaching English majors is twofold:

  1. To provide graduates with a solid preparation for graduate studies (e.g. Master’s Degree in Education, Master of Fine Arts, Master’s in Professional Writing/ Communication, Literature, Library Science, Rhetoric and Composition, as well as Pre-Law).
  2. To educate generalists for job placement in the publishing industry, in creative and editorial positions, in education, in businesses, in government, and in nonprofit agencies.

The more general, non-career oriented objective of the English program at UW-Platteville is to educate citizens who understand, think about, and argue complex cultural issues. Speci?cally our literature and advanced composition courses are designed to broaden students’ perspectives and to increase their cultural literacy. Students gain personally and professionally from an education in American, British, World, and other literatures by becoming intellectually more astute and literate. Technical Writing experience and other professional skills, including training in Teaching English as a Second or Other Language, are all highly marketable skills that graduates acquire in our program. Our emphasis on the broad variety of human experiences through internships, community-based (service) learning, as well as participation in forums on and off-campus, helps students to participate in meaningful ways in society. Graduates in English are taught to apply their knowledge in all personal, professional, and social situations in which ethical decisions demand a deepened knowledge of the human condition and an understanding of the past.

Specific Teaching Objectives Of The English Program

Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the English program shall be competent and knowledgeable in:

  1. using language, in particular writing, to fit a variety of audiences and purposes;
  2. integrating logic, argumentation and interpersonal communication skills (both verbal and non-verbal);
  3. understanding a breadth of writing and ideas by female and male authors, both classic and contemporary, including a representative body of literature encompassing works of diverse national, cultural and ethnic groups;
  4. distinguishing the function and variety of literary and aesthetic forms, including fiction, non-fiction, drama and poetry;
  5. analyzing, interpreting, evaluating, and appreciating print and non-print texts, including film;
  6. applying historic and contemporary rhetorical theories to all media and communication contexts;
  7. conducting research, using a variety of sources, and reporting ?ndings in diverse and appropriate formats and media.

The Writing Center (Director: Evelyn Martens)

Although the Writing Center is administered by Student Affairs, it is located in proximity to the English professors’ of?ces, at 360 Gardner Hall. At the Writing Center, student tutors, many of whom are English majors, meet one-to-one with UW-Platteville students to discuss all kinds of writing, from freshmen composition papers to lab reports to resumés. The goal of the Writing Center is to help students to become better writers. Through conversations with peer tutors, students will learn to more effectively read and revise their own writing.

General Requirements Bachelor Of Arts Degree

Total for Graduation 120 credits
General Education 44-58 credits
Major Studies 36 credits

First-Year Composition (6 credits)

English 1130 and 1230 are pre-requisites for most English courses. English majors must complete the ?rst-year composition sequence, earn transfer credit for equivalent courses taken elsewhere, or pass the 1130 test-out exam BEFORE taking any English course at the 2000-level or above.

Although the General Education requirement is satis?ed with a grade of “C” or better in English 1130 and 1230, English majors and minors must achieve a “B” or better in these ?rst-year composition courses.

Foreign Language Requirement (up to 16 credits)

All English majors must earn a “C” or better in the required foreign language courses.

Professional Writing And Literature English Majors: (4-16 credits)

Beyond UW-Platteville’s General Education requirement for a foreign language, Professional Writing and English Literature majors are also required to complete one foreign language through the fourth college semester (French 2140, German 2340, or Spanish 2940). Students must contact Professor Laura Anderson, the contact person of the Foreign Language Program in 228 Warner Hall, to determine at which level they should begin. Professor Anderson and other staff can also determine competency and retroactive credit.

English Education Majors: (4-12 credits)

Beyond UWP’s General Education requirement for a foreign language, English Education majors are also required to complete one foreign language through the third college semester (French 2040, German 2240, or Spanish 2840). Students must contact Professor Laura Anderson, the contact person of the Foreign Language Program in 228 Warner Hall, to determine at which level they should begin. Professor Anderson and other staff can also determine competency and retroactive credit.

Philosophy Requirement (up to 6 credits)

All English majors must earn a “C” or better in the required Philosophy courses.

Professional Writing And Literature English Majors: (6 credits)

Six credits from any Philosophy courses listed in the catalogue are required.

English Education Majors: (3 credits)

Students majoring in English Education must take either PHILOSOPHY 1130, “Introduction to Philosophy” or PHILOSOPHY 2530, “Ethics.”

Licensure Requirement For English Education Majors:

All students intending to become licensed teachers must satisfy the requirements outline in the section “Teacher Licensure,” listed under that heading under the School of Education catalog description and course outline.

Writing Portfolio Requirement:

Upon entering the junior year, English Literature and English Professional writing majors (but no English Education majors) must submit a portfolio of their writing to the English program for approval before they may graduate. Requirements for a completed portfolio include at least eight items (no more than three from ?rst-year composition courses; three papers that are at least four pages long; one paper that is a literary analysis; and one paper that is a research paper). The portfolio is evaluated by English faculty on a pass/fail basis.

Pre-Requisites And Other Requirements:

All literature courses, except ENGLISH 3930, “Literature for Young Adults” and ENGLISH 3990, “Topics in Language, Literature or Writing,” count as Humanities credit towards the general education requirements. All courses numbered 2000 or above have ENGLISH 1230 as a pre-requisite.

Option I - English Literature Major(36 credits)

At least one of the above courses other than Shakespeare must focus on literature before 1800.

Option II - English Education Major (36 credits)

At least three of the above literature courses must be at the 3000 level or above.

Required Courses for School of Education (6 credits)

Requirements for the School of Education

  1. Pass Pre-Professional Skills Test
  2. Apply in sophomore year to the School of Education
  3. Fulfill requirements on Middle/Secondary Education Checklist
  4. Pass English Content Test
  5. Satisfy the requirements outlined in the section “Teacher Licensure Requirements” listed under Education in this catalog.

Option III - Professional Writing Major (36 credits)

Twenty-one additional credits, at least twelve of which are English, selected from the following:

English Non-Teaching Minor (24 credits)

English Education Minor (24 credits)

At least two of the above literature courses must be at the 3000 level or above.

Creative Writing Minor (24 credits)

Required courses:

Two literature courses, one of which must be from the following list:

* May be repeated for credit

Students who take less than 24 credits from the above list may complete the minor by selecting up to six credits from:

* May be repeated for credit.

Teaching English as a Second or Other Language Minor (TESL) (24 credits)

Required courses:

A course which focuses on American minority communities, selected from:

Students already fluent in a second language may select six credits from the following:

Language Arts Minor (26 credits)

Two literature courses, excluding ENGLISH 3930 6 cr

Six credits of speech and/or theatre courses, selected from: 6 cr

A writing course, selected from the following: 3 cr

Writing Certificate (18 credits)

A minimum of 18 credits selected from the following, at least 12 of which are in English:

Foreign Languages

http://www.uwplatt.edu/humanities/forlang.htm

Contact: Laura Anderson
Office: 228 Warner Hall
Phone: 608-342-1171
E-mail: andersla@uwplatt.edu
Professor:
Raymond Spoto (Spanish)
Associate Professor:
Laura Anderson (French/Spanish)
Mark Evenson (Spanish)
Patrick Hagen (German)
Lecturer:
Jean Bascom (Spanish)

I. The mission of our program is multiple:

  1. Serve well the general education mission of the university in the areas of foreign language competencies and the humanities.
  2. Prepare students via language skills and cultural exposure for professions in business, law enforcement, communications, counseling, translation, and other fields.
  3. Prepare highly qualified foreign language teachers in conjunction with the DPI and the UW-Platteville School of Education through our teaching-minor and teaching-major programs. Students must also attain a level of mastery in the areas of teaching methods and knowledge of theories of second language acquisition.

II. Goals and Objectives

About The Foreign Languages Program And Majors

Our foreign language program offers majors in German and Spanish, along with minors in French, German and Spanish. Students who major in foreign languages ?nd career opportunities in many areas such as international business, marketing, civil-service work, diplomacy, and law enforcement. Students who wish to teach French, German or Spanish must be admitted to the School of Education, meet all of the requirements for teacher certi?cation, and also take FRENCH 4000, GERMAN 4000, or SPANISH 4000 Teaching of Foreign Languages (credits do not count toward major or minor).

Minor studies in French, German and Spanish are designed for students interested in combining a minor in a foreign language with other areas of study for the purpose of enhancing communication skills and career opportunities. Likewise, apart from the intellectual development that results from the study of the French, German, or Spanish language, its literature, and its civilization, students may also ?nd professional employment in international business, marketing, civil service, and teaching.

All students intending to become licensed teachers must satisfy the requirements outlined in the section, “Teacher Licensure,” listed under School of Education.

Foreign Language Competency/Retroactive Credits

All students are required to demonstrate competency in a foreign language. The competency consists of the following: one year (two semesters) of one foreign language at the 1000 level or two years (four semesters) of a foreign language in high school with a grade of “C” or higher in the second year of high-school foreign language study. Foreign languages other than the languages taught at UW-Platteville may satisfy this competency.

Students may receive retroactive college credit for their high school foreign language studies. Pro?ciency acquired in high school may be counted toward graduation and toward the number of credits in the major or minor. Students ordinarily earn a maximum of eight retroactive credits. However, students with high pro?ciency may earn more retroactive credit as determined by the department.

In order to earn retroactive credit, a student must enroll in a second-semester course or higher, and must earn a grade of “A” or “B” in that course. A student will then receive, in addition to credit for the course completed, retroactive credits for the course or courses skipped at the 1000 or 2000 levels.

General Requirements

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Total for Graduation 120 credits
General Education 44-58 credits
Major Studies 36 credits

Non-teaching German and Spanish majors, in addition to the requirements for the major, are also required to take 9 credits of English literature and philosophy with no more than two courses from one of the above areas. Students may select any philosophy or English literature course at the 2000 level or higher.

Students who major in a foreign language are required to take eight or nine credits in our Study Abroad Program at the 3000-4000 level. Similar or comparable cultural experiences could also be accepted.

Bachelor of Science Degree

(available for education majors only)

Total for Graduation 120 credits
General Education 44-58 credits
Major Studies 40 (foreign-language education majors) credits

In addition to the credits required for German and Spanish majors in Education, there is also a requirement for one philosophy course (Introduction to Philosophy 1130 or Ethics 2530).

Students who major in a foreign language are required to take eight or nine credits in our Study Abroad Program at the 3000-4000 level. Similar or comparable cultural experiences could also be accepted.

A Certificate in Foreign Languages

This program is designed to provide students with the language proficiency skills required for oral communication in German, French and Spanish. Conversation is stressed with some emphasis on civilization in order to provide knowledge and awareness of the culture. Students in this limited sequence of language courses are encouraged to couple foreign language skills with other areas of study so as to take advantage of career opportunities in foreign languages. The program consists of 18 credits taken in an orderly sequence, which includes elementary and intermediate language courses along with a two-credit course in practical conversation. Retroactive credit may be obtained for previous study in high school. See section under Foreign Language Competency/Retroactive Credits.

French

The Department of Humanities offers a minor in French for students interested in combining a minor in a foreign language with other areas of study for the purpose of enhancing communication skills and career opportunities. Likewise, apart from the intellectual development that results from the study of the French language, its literature, and its civilization, students may also find professional employment in international business, marketing, civil service, and teaching.

French Minor (24 Credits)

Requires a total of 24 credits with a minimum of 8 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. Students who minor in French must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the French courses they take.

French Education Minor (28 credits)

Requires a total of 28 credits with a minimum of 12 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. FRENCH 4000 Teaching of Foreign Languages is an additional requirement of the School of Education (credits do not count toward minor). Likewise, students interested in teaching must satisfy the language immersion requirement by enrolling in FREN 3000 Foreign Language Travel Abroad Seminar for at least two credits. See the French instructor for details. French minors must have a GPA of no lower than a 2.50 in French courses.

Required:

Courses:

Required for those enrolled in the School of Education:

German

German Major (36 Credits)

Requires a total of 36 credits with a minimum of 20 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. Phonetics (4220) and Civilization (3530) are required. Students who major in German must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the German courses they take, and meet the study abroad requirement by completing 8-9 credits in our Study Abroad Program at the 3000-4000 level. Similar or comparable cultural experiences could also be accepted.

In addition, students completing a Bachelor of Arts Degree are required to take 9 credits of English literature and philosophy with no more than two courses from each area (2000 level or above).

German Education Major (40 Credits)

Requires a total of 40 credits with a minimum of 24 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. Phonetics (4220) and Civilization (3530) are required. GERMAN 4000 Teaching of Foreign Languages is an additional requirement of the School of Education (credits do not count toward major). Students who major in German must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the language courses they take, and meet the study abroad requirement by completing 8-9 credits in our Study Abroad Program at the 3000-4000 level. Similar or comparable cultural experiences could also be accepted. In addition, German Education majors completing a Bachelor of Science Degree are required to take either 1130 Intro to Philosophy or 2530 Ethics.

German Minor (24 Credits)

selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. Students who minor in German must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the German courses they take.

German Education Minor (28 Credits)

Requires a total of 28 credits with a minimum of 12 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. Phonetics (4220) and Civilization (3530) are required. GERMAN 4000 Teaching of Foreign Languages is an additional requirement of the School of Education (credits do not count toward minor). Likewise, students interested in teaching must satisfy the language immersion requirement by enrolling in the Foreign Language Travel Abroad Seminar for at least two credits. See the German instructor for details. German minors must have a GPA of no lower than a 2.50 in German courses.

Required for those enrolled in the School of Education:

Spanish

Spanish Major (36 credits)

Requires a total of 36 credits with a minimum of 20 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher, including courses in phonetics and civilization. Students who major in Spanish must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the Spanish courses they take, and meet the study abroad requirement by completing 8-9 credits in our Study Abroad Program at the 3000-4000 level. Similar or comparable cultural experiences could also be accepted. In addition, students completing a Bachelor of Arts Degree are required to take 9 credits of English literature and philosophy with no more than two courses from each area (2000 level or above).

Spanish Education Major (40 credits)

Requires a total of 40 credits with a minimum of 24 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher, including courses in phonetics and civilization. SPANISH 4000 Teaching of Foreign Languages is an additional requirement of the School of Education (credits do not count toward major). Students who major in Spanish must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the Spanish courses they take, and meet the study abroad requirement by completing 8-9 credits in our Study Abroad Program at the 3000-4000 level. Similar or comparable cultural experiences could also be accepted.

In addition, Spanish Education majors completing a Bachelor of Science Degree are required to take either 1130 Intro to Philosophy or 2530 Ethics.

Spanish Minor (24 credits)

Requires a total of 24 credits with a minimum of 8 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher. Students who minor in Spanish must have a grade-point average of no lower than a 2.50 in the Spanish courses they take.

Spanish Education Minor (28 credits)

Requires a total of 28 credits with a minimum of 12 credits selected from courses numbered 3000 or higher, including courses in phonetics and civilization. SPANISH 4000 Teaching of Foreign Languages is an additional requirement of the School of Education (credits do not count toward minor). Likewise, students interested in teaching must satisfy the language immersion requirement by enrolling in the Foreign Language Travel Abroad Seminar for at least two credits. See the Spanish instructor for details. Spanish minors must have a GPA of no lower than a 2.50 in Spanish courses.

Required for those enrolled in the School of Education:

Philosophy

http://www.uwplatt.edu/humanities/philos.html

Contact: Shane Drefcinski
Office: 339 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608-342-1828
E-mail: drefcins@uwplatt.edu
Associate Professsor:
Shane Drefcinski
Assistant Professors:
Mary Lenzi
Lecturers:
Michael Sharkey
Jess Tarp
Anthony Valentine

About The Philosophy Program And Major

Philosophy literally means the “love of wisdom.” As a discipline of the mind, it calls us to think critically about the most fundamental questions of life. What does it mean to be human? How are we humans related to the rest of reality? What constitutes reality? Is the universe friendly or indifferent to human purpose? To what extent are we free or not free? What purposes ought we to pursue? What is good and evil? What are the possibilities and limitations of human power and understanding? By what criteria can such questions be addressed? What constitutes knowledge? Are there different ways of knowing? What role do assumptions play in what we think is true? By challenging students to think carefully about questions like these, the philosophy program provides an excellent foundation for graduate school as well as a pathway not only to making a life but also to making a living in careers such as law, teaching, business, the ministry, journalism, and art.

Two programs are offered in philosophy: a major in philosophy and a minor in philosophy. Both programs encourage students to address in a disciplined way the most fundamental questions of life.

Statement Of Purpose In Light Of The Uwplatteville Mission Statement

With regard to our mission, the Philosophy program has two main goals:

The first goal is to help students in their courses, but especially our philosophy majors and minors, to become what UW-Platteville pledges in the first item of its mission statement, namely, “to become broader in perspective, more literate, intellectually more astute, ethically more sensitive, and to participate wisely in society as a competent professional and knowledgeable citizen.”

The second goal is to provide our majors and minors the opportunity to develop in depth their ability to think critically about the most fundamental (and inescapable) questions that humans can raise about reality, knowledge and values. As a corollary to this second goal, we aim to give our majors and minors a solid preparation for whatever they pursue after graduation, whether it be graduate studies, law school, medicine, education, academic computing, journalism, social work, ministry, a fine art, or business.

Student Learning Outcomes

What do we believe that majors and minors in the UWPlatteville philosophy program should know? Students who major or minor in philosophy will:

  1. acquire a broad understanding of the history of Western philosophy;
  2. become more ethically sensitive through the careful study of various ethical theories;
  3. enhance their ability to analyze and clarify ideas;
  4. refine their ability to think logically;
  5. demonstrate their ability to present their ideas and arguments effectively, both orally and in writing.

General Requirements

Bachelor of Arts Degree

Total for Graduation 120 credits
General Education 44-58 credits
Major Studies 36 credits

Philosophy majors, in addition to the requirements for the major, are also required to take one of the following foreign language courses: FRENCH 2140, GERMAN 2340, or SPANISH 2940. Majors in Philosophy are also required to take two English literature courses at the 2000 level or above.

Philosophy Major (36 credits)

A minimum of 36 credits, including PHLSPHY 1130 Introduction to Philosophy or PHLSPHY 2230 Contemporary World-Views, PHLSPHY 2330 Origins of Western Philosophy, PHLSPHY 2430 Philosophy in the Modern World, four 3000-level seminars and two 4000-level seminars. Religious studies courses and PHLSPHY 4330 Philosophy of Education may not be taken for credit toward a major in philosophy.

Philosophy Minor (24 credits)

A minimum of 24 credits, including the same courses and restrictions as the major except that only two 3000-level seminars and one 4000-level seminar are required.