Biology

http://www.uwplatt.edu/biology

Department Chair: Wayne Weber
Office: 247/249 Gardner Hall
Phone: 608-342-1793
E-mail: weberwa@uwplatt.edu
Professor:
Marilyn Tufte
Associate Professors:
Elizabeth Frieders
Esther Ofulue
Wayne Weber
Assistant Professors:
Amanda Trewin
Kristopher Wright
Program Assistant:
Jayne E. Tippett
Laboratory Manager:
Gloria J. Stuckey
Senior Lecturer:
Elizabeth Duewer
Lecturers:
David Miller
Wendy Stankovich

Major:

Biology
General Biology (Teaching)
General Biology (Non Teaching)
Botany
Cell and Molecular Biology
Cytotechnology
Field Biology
Zoology

Minors:

Biology (Non Teaching)
Biology (Teaching)
Biotechnology

Pre-Professional Programs

Purpose Statement:

The Biology program provides biology students a fundamental knowledge of biology along with introducing students to the major areas in biology, and providing opportunities to explore these areas. In this endeavor, the biology department provides students the ability to critically apply biological concepts to the understanding of natural phenomena and to deal with biology related health, societal and conservation issues. In addition, the biology program prepares students for: advanced study and research in the biological and related sciences, healthcare professional programs, wildlife and forestry professional programs, veterinary professional programs, careers in education and biology related industry and governmental service. The biology program also provides courses for general education in the natural sciences to introduce students to science, biology, biological concepts and how these affect society. Finally, the biology program provides courses to support other university programs such as Agriculture, Education, Physical Education, Chemistry and Engineering.

Learning Outcomes

Through the biology department curriculum, students should...

Attitudes

  1. appreciate science and especially biology. This appreciation should include how science and biology permeates our society and many other aspects of our lives.
  2. develop a curiosity for the world around them. This curiosity should include not only "how does that work?" or "what is that bug" or "how are genes expressed," but also "how do we know that?" or "how can we figure this out?".
  3. develop respect for equiptment and specimens or materials. Biologists depend on these things and the proper care and want to case for them is critical.
  4. develop an enthusiasm and motivation for biology and the sciences.
  5. further develop integrity. This development would include integrity in scientific endeavors and communication such as the issues of plagiarism and "fudging data" in research.

Skills

  1. be able to understand and apply the scientific method. Students need to understand what the process of science is and what it is not. In this light, students should understand its limitations.
  2. develop and apply communication skille.
    1. These communication skills include being able to present in a logical, understandable fashion, ideas or information in written, oral and visual formats.
    2. These skills also include "people" or inter-personal skills. Our students should be able to present themselves in a positive and professional way when interacting with others.
  3. develop and apply critical thinking skills. Students should then be able to apply these skills to problems and/or issues in science, nature and society. This would include critical analysis and synthesis associated with the examination of literature and other informational resources.
  4. develop resourcefulness and inventiveness. Students should develop the means to be able to identify and utilize available, pertinent resources (including those within his/her own person) in solving of problems, the scientific process and in dealing with societal issues.
  5. develop creativity. This would include developing novel ideas and approaches to solving problems, dealing with issues and experimental approaches.
  6. be able to integrate multiple disciplines in the practice of science. For example, biology depends on the fundamental understanding of many other disciplines including physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology and geography.
  7. develop and apply skills for the proper use and care of equipment.

Knowledge

  1. Hierarchy of Biological Structure - Students should be able to describe the hierarchy and illustrate how the hierarchical context relates to different organisms. Students should also be able to explain the relationships amoung the sifferent levels of the hierarchy and how those interactions influence organisms. Lastly, studnets should be able to distinguish biologicla systems within the context of the hierarchy.
  2. Evolution - Students should be able to summarize the concept of evolution and assess the role of evolution in biology. Students also should be able to integrate the concepts of natural selection and evolution. Lastly, students should be able to relate the diversity of life to evolution and natural selection.
  3. Diversity of Life - Students should be able to differentiate various organisms according to their evolutionary relationships. Students should also be able to explain how and why systematic approaches are used to organize and understand the diversity of organisms. Lastly, students should be able to describe how the concept of species fits within the context of biology.
  4. Ecology - Students should be able to illustrate the interrelationship amoung organisms and the interrelationships between organisms and the environment. Students should also be able to describe energy and nutrient cycles and infer how those cycles influence organisms and the environment. Lastly, students should be able to relate ecological concepts to various disciplines within biology.
  5. Genetics - Students should be able to describe the structure and expression of gener. Students should also be able to demonstrate the role of inheritance in determining differences amont individual organisms, populations and species. Lastly, students should be able to summarize the relationships among DNA, RNA and protein synthesis.
  6. Cells - Students should be able to compare and contrast the structures and functions of various cell types. Students should also be able to illustrate the processes of mitosis and meiosis, as well as describe the roles hese processes have in a biological context. Lastly, students should be able to explain and relate the concepts of cellular respiration and photosynthesis.
  7. Properties of Life - Students should be able to summarize the properties that are expressed by all living things. Consequently, students should also be able to discriminate living entities from non-living entities. Lastly, studnets should be able to describe the theory of chemical evolution (i.e. the biological explanation of how life began on earth).
  8. Energy - Students should be able to explain what energy is and the different forms of energy. Students should also be able to apply the 1st and 2nd Laws of Thermodynamics to the form and function of biological systems. Lastly, students should be able to relate the concepts of entropy and homeostasis.
  9. Process of Science - Students should be able to collect, analyze, interpret, summarize and present biological data within the context of the scientific method. Students should also be able to distinguish between experimental and observational approaches and assess how each might be used to answer scientific questions. Students should also be able to integrate previous findings from scientific literature into both approaches. Lastly, students should be able to formulate testable hypotheses and assess the appropriate methods to test those hypotheses.
  10. History of Science - Students should be able to relate historical contributions to science with the current approaches and knowledge base within biology. Students should also be able to describe the contributions of various individuals to the science of biology. Lastly,
  11. Science and Society - Students should be able to illustrate how biology relates to society. As citizens, students should also be able to make informed decisions about biological issues and policies. Lastly, students should be able to differentiate the means by which biology is communicated to society and assess the advantages and disadvantages of each.
  12. Bioethics - Students should be able to identify and assess different positions associated with ethical issues in biology. Students should also be able to describe the role of ethics in their present and future biological careers. Lastly, students should be able to explain the impact and importance of ethics on science and biology.

About the Department and Major

Biology is the study of life (It's hard to get any better than that!) The study of biology is truly immense, including different forms of life ranging from the microscopic, such as bacteria, to much more complex forms like the tree outside, or you and I. Biologists study these different forms of life, their interactions, and life processes. Because the field of biology is so immense, there are many different types of biologists. These include, but are not limited to:

botanists- study plants
zoologists- study animals
entomologists- study insects
ecologists- study how organisms interact with each other and the environment
geneticists- study inheritance and gene expression
cell/molecular biologists- study cell and gene structure and function at a molecular level
microbiologists- study bacteria
physiologists- study organism physiology.

Obviously, these disciplines are not mutually exclusive, and indeed, their interaction is necessary in the pursuit of understanding life. The primary objectives of the biology major at UW-P are: 1) to stimulate an appreciation for biology 2) to prepare students with practical and theoretical knowledge and 3) to develop intellectual and manipulative skills to function in a specific area of biology. Many graduates go on to pursue advanced training in graduate and professional schools and/or careers in biotechnology, wildlife biology, ecology, forestry and other areas.

General Requirements

Bachelor of Science Degree

Total for Graduation 120 credits
General Education 44-58 credits
Major Studies 36 credits

Biology Major (36 credits)

All Biology majors must complete core courses, a field biology course, and an emphasis area.

Biology Core Courses (21 credits):

Field biology courses (1 or more credits):

The field course will count within the requirements of an emphasis where appropriate.

Credits earned at an accredited field station are accepted toward a major provided they fit within the general requirements for the major and have department approval.

Other:

Courses in biochemistry and other advanced chemistry, computer science, foreign languages, physics, and statistics and other advanced mathematics are strongly recommended or may be required for certain emphases.

Majors are strongly recommended to take MATH 1830 (Statistics).

No more than 48 credits from biology may be counted toward the 120 credits required for graduation.

A grade of "C" or higher is required in all courses which are counted for a major in biology. A grade of "C" or better is also required in Chemistry 1140, 1240, and in English 1130, 1230, and 3000.

NOTE: A total of three credits in BIOLOGY 4410, and/or 4920 count toward the 36-credit biology major.

General Biology Emphasis (Teaching or Nonteaching)

Biology Core Courses: 21
Field Requirement: 1 or more credits

Botany Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Teaching majors are strongly recommended to take BIOLOGY 3640

Zoology Courses: Minimum 3 credits.

Teaching majors are strongly recommended to take BIOLOGY 2140 or 2340

General Advanced Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Electives to complete major:

Botany Emphasis

Required:

Concurrent registration in Organic Chemistry 3540 and 3510.

Biology Core Courses: 21
Field Requirement: 1 or more credits

Botany Courses: Minimum 7 credits:

Advanced General Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Electives to complete major:

up to three credits may be selected from:

Cell and Molecular Biology Emphasis

Biology Core Courses: 21 cr
Field Requirement: 1 or more credits

Required:

Concurrent registration in Organic Chemistry 3540 and 3510.

Concurrent registration in Biochemistry 4630 and 4610.

Advanced Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Electives to complete major:

3-4 credits of electives may be selected from AGSCI 3220 or 4340.

Cytotechnology Emphasis

Ninety-three (93) semester credits at UW-Platteville are required before application to the professional phase of the program, including a minimum of 20 credits in biology and a minimum of 8 credits in chemistry. BIOLOGY 2140 or 2340 and 4340 are strongly recommended. If accepted into the program, the final 36 credits are earned at the School of Cytotechnology, State Laboratory of Hygiene, Madison, Wisconsin. Please contact the biology chair for further information.

Field Biology Emphasis

Biology Core Courses: 21

Required:

Accredited college biological field station course(s), 3 or more credits.

Field Biology Emphasis Electives

A minimum of 9 credits must be selected from the following courses:

Electives to complete major:

NOTE: BIOLOGY 4660 is strongly recommended but does not count toward the 36 credit major. Students may take more than one cooperative field experience with a maximum of eight credits counting toward graduation.

Zoology Emphasis

Biology Core Courses: 21
Field Requirement: 1 or more credits

Required:

Concurrent registration in Organic Chemistry 3540 and 3510

Zoology Courses: Minimum 7 credits:

Advanced Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Electives to complete major:

Minors in Biology

Biology Minor: Nonteaching (24 credits)

Required:

Advanced Botany Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Advanced Zoology Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Advanced General Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Field Biology: One course from the following:

Credits earned at an accredited field station are accepted toward a minor provided they fit within the general requirements for the minor and have departmental approval.

Electives to complete the minor:

Credits earned at an accredited field station are accepted toward a minor provided they fit within the general requirements for the minor and have departmental approval.

A minimum of eight credits must be earned in biology courses numbered above 3000.

A grade of "C" or higher is required in all courses which are counted for a minor in biology.

NOTE: Biology 4410, 4660, and 4920 do not count toward the 24 credit biology minor.

Biology Minor: Teaching (24 credits)

Required:

Advanced Botany Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

(BIOLOGY 2440 or 3640 is strongly recommended.)

Advanced Zoology Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

(BIOLOGY 2140 or 2340 is strongly recommended)

Advanced General Courses: Minimum 3 credits:

Field Biology: 1 course from the following:

Credits earned at an accredited field station are accepted toward a minor provided they fit within the general requirements for the minor and have departmental approval.

Electives to complete the minor:

Credits earned at an accredited field station are accepted toward a minor provided they fit within the general requirements for the minor and have departmental approval.

A minimum of eight credits must be earned in biology courses numbered above 3000.

A grade of "C" or higher is required in all courses which are counted for a minor in biology.

NOTE: Biology 4410, 4660, and 4920 do not count toward the 24 credit biology minor.

Biotechnology Minor (24 credits)

Required:

Physiology co-requisite: Select 3-4 credits:

Course credits do not count toward completion of the minor.

Tissue Culture Course(s): Select 2-4 credits:

Electives to complete minor: Select 7-10 credits:

Up to 3 credits may be selected from:

Pre-Professional Programs

The following pre-professional programs are administered and advised through the Biology Department:

Pre-Professional Program Advisor Address Phone
Pre-Chiropractic Wayne Weber 249 Gardner 608-342-1611
Pre-Dentistry Wayne Weber 249 Gardner 608-342-1611
Pre-Fisheries Kristopher Wright 254 Gardner 608-342-1689
Pre-Forestry Kristopher Wright 254 Gardner 608-342-1689
Pre-Medical Technology Wayne Weber 249 Gardner 608-342-1611
Pre-Medicine Amanda Trewin 255 Gardner 608-342-1527
Pre-Nursing Amanda Trewin 255 Gardner 608-342-1527
Pre-Occupational Therapy Marilyn Tufte 253 Gardner 608-342-1664
Pre-Optometry Wayne Weber 249 Gardner 608-342-1611
Pre-Osteopathy Amanda Trewin 255 Gardner 608-342-1527
Pre-Physician Assistant Amanda Trewin 255 Gardner 608-342-1527
Pre-Physical Therapy Marilyn Tufte 253 Gardner 608-342-1664
Pre-Podiatry Amanda Trewin 255 Gardner 608-342-1527
Pre-Wildlife Management Jeff Huebschman 262 Gardner 608-342-1742

The descriptions of these programs are listed under the Special Academic Programs section. Program fact sheets are available in the Biology Department Office or from the department chair.