ENGRG 5000 3 credits Engineering Communication
Emphasizes methods of communication in the engineering workplace, including the development and writing of proposals, technical manuals, design reports, and business presentations. Effective teamwork communication strategies for virtual and co-located project teams will be addressed.
ENGRG 5030 3 credits Linear Algebra
This course is an online introductory course in linear algebra. This foundation course is designed to prepare a student for study in the Master of Science in Engineering program. Matrices, systems of equations, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, vector spaces, linear transformations, and diagonalization. This course is not appropriate for students seeking a MS or MA degree in mathematics. P: MATH 2740 with a grade of "C" or better.
ENGRG 6050 3 credits Applied Statistics
This course is an online introductory course in statistics. This foundation course is designed to prepare a student for study in the Master of Science in Engineering program or the Master of Science in Project Management program. This course will cover basic concepts of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and applications of statistics including simple linear regression, multiple regression, basic design of experiments and ANOVA. This course is not appropriate for students seeking a MS or MA degree in Mathematics. P: Math 2740 with a grade of "C" or better.
ENGRG 6230 3 credits Structural Steel Design with LRFD
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the design of steel structures by the load and resistance factor design (LRFD) method. The newest steel specification requires a strength method (like LRFD) to be used. The allowable stress method (ASD) has been renamed the allowable strength method, and is based on many of the principles of LRFD design. A general overview of the new ASD method will be given, but the focus of the class will be on designing structures with LRFD. Students will learn to design tension and compression members, beams and beam-columns, and connections. A low-rise steel office building will be designed throughout the semester as a group design project. P: CIVILENG 3100 - Structural Mechanics (or equivalent) is required. Familiarity with a structural analysis program (e.g., RISA-2D, STAAD, etc.) will be beneficial but not required.
ENGRG 7030 3 credits Simulation Modeling of Engineering Systems
This introductory course is applied simulation taught at the graduate level. It is also a system analysis course. Students learn how to analyze systems and how to represent them in the simulation model. Students are expected to bring topics and problems to class and to contribute in significant discussion about the material. This is a hands-on course. Students are taught simulation theory through practice in developing more and more complex models. The course includes a range of simulation styles including: basic manual simulation (rolling dice, random number tables); simple automated simulation (use of general purpose software like BASIC, spreadsheets, macros); traditional simulation (coded programs with tabular results); real time monitoring (graphic displays during simulation); and state-of-the-art object oriented software (including two and three dimensional animation). P: A calculus-based statistics course is required. No prior knowledge of simulation is required, nor is any computer programming experience. Basic familiarity with computing in general is needed (files, folders, basic editing operations, etc.), but nothing advanced. A fundamental understanding of probability and statistics is needed.
ENGRG 7070 3 credits Optimization with Engineering Applications
Students will be able to solve a variety of optimization problems using optimization software or the optimization routines available in spreadsheets (e.g. Excel or Quattro). Linear, nonlinear, and discrete problems will be solved. Students will learn the theory of improving search methods, which are the basis for all optimization algorithms. An emphasis will be placed on the need for the modeler to examine the practicality of program results. Also, students will perform a Life Cycle Analysis, which is an optimization procedure that minimizes the impacts on the environment.
ENGRG 7220 3 credits Dynamics of Structures
Dynamic analysis of structures using simplified single-degreeof- freedom models, model analysis and static condensation. Assumptions used in numeric analysis methods will be explored in order to better understand the output from computer analysis. Application of dynamic analysis as implemented in the International Building Code. P: GENENG 2230, Recommended: MATH 3230 Linear Algebra, MATH 3630 Differential Equations, CIVILENG 3100 Structural Mechanics (or equivalent for all courses listed).
ENGRG 7260 3 credits Advanced Shallow Foundation Design with LRFD Applications
This course is designed to fully prepare a student with only an introductory course in soil mechanics to: analyze the bearing capacity of shallow foundations; to design shallow foundations to meeting bearing capacity and settlement requirements; to design reinforced concrete shallow foundations; and to apply Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) principles to the design and analysis of shallow foundations. P: Civil Engineering 3730 Geotechnical Engineering (or an equivalent course in soil mechanics).
ENGRG 7270 3 credits Advanced Deep Foundation Design with LRFD Applications
This course is designed to fully prepare a student with a course in deep foundations to: analyze the bearing capacity of deep foundations; to design deep foundations to meet bearing capacity and settlement requirements; to design reinforced concrete deep foundations (drilled shafts); and to apply Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) principles to the design and analysis of deep foundations. P: ENGRG 7260 or equivalent.
ENGRG 7280 (formerly CEE 7280) 3 credits Geosynthetics Engineering
This course is designed to fully prepare a student with only an introductory course in soil mechanics to recognize, design, and analyze the geosynthetic alternatives to traditional civil engineering project features such as: subsurface drainage systems; beddings and filters for erosion control systems; erosion control systems; temporary runoff and sediment control; roadways and pavement systems; embankments on soft foundations; stability of steep slopes; retaining walls and abutments; and landfill final cover and base liner systems. P: CIVILENG 3730 Geotechnical Engineering I (a course in soil mechanics) and CIVILENG 3300 Fluid Mechanics, or equivalents of both of these courses.
ENGRG 7290 3 credits Earth Retaining Structures: Design, Analysis and LRFD
This course is designed to fully prepare a student with only an introductory course in soil mechanics to recognize, design, and analyze concrete retaining walls, MSE walls, cantilever and anchored sheetpile walls, braced excavations, and cofferdams using conventional and Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) concepts. P: CIVILENG 3730 Geotechnical Engineering I (a course in soil mechanics) and ENGRG 7280 Geosynthetics Engineering, or equivalents of both of these courses.
ENGRG 7310 3 credits Control Systems Engineering
This course is intended as a first semester graduate course designed for distance education. It covers the basics for building a practical control system incorporating a microcontroller or PLC. Basic electronics, logic, programming for microprocessors and PLC's, fractional horsepower motors, and sensors will be introduced. Control theory implementing electro-mechanical systems will be reviewed. P: consent of instructor.
ENGRG 7320 3 credits Modern Control Systems
This course is intended as a second semester course in the MOE Program in EE. It develops analysis and synthesis techniques for linear dynamical systems using the tools from matrix theory, linear algebra, and Laplace transform. P: BS degree in engineering and ENGRG 7310.
ENGRG 7340 3 credits Digital Control Systems
Digital Controller Design in time and frequency domain. State space modeling, controllability, observability, stability, minimal realization, pole placement and observer design. P: a BS degree in Engineering, with some background in Automatic Control Area. ENGRG 7310 and ENGRG 7320.
ENGRG 7510 3 credits Design of Experiments
This course on Design of Experiments (DOE) provides experiences in planning, conducting, and analyzing statistically designed experiments. The methods of DOE may be applied to design or improve products and processes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), test of hypothesis, confidence interval estimation, response surface methods, and other statistical methods are applied in this course to set values for design, process, or control factors so that one or more responses will be optimized, even when noise factors are present in the system. This course is designed to teach the nuts and bolts of DOE as simply as possible. P: MATH 4030 or ENGRG 6050, or consent of instructor.
ENGRG 7520 3 credits Design for Manufacturability
A major portion of the costs and in turn the profitability of manufacturing organizations are affected by the quality of the design of their products. Building quality into the design will call upon engineers to systematically design a product and/or process so that it can be produced with lowest costs, rapid response time, and meet customers' expectations. This will require the integration of design, manufacturing, management, and economic principles. The course will address this overall integration and focus on the design for manufacturing aspects so as to provide faster time to market, productive utilization of equipment, faster delivery, improved quality, reduced cost, and effective continuous improvement. Students will be able to systematically design a product and/or process so that it can be produced with lowest costs, rapid response time, and meet customers' expectations. In doing so, they will be able to identify opportunity for design, address technical considerations of design & manufacturing, and make a business decision on feasibility of design.
ENGRG 7540 3 credits Advanced Finite Element Method
Introduces the finite element method. Emphasizes beam and frame analysis, plane strain, axisymmetric, and three-dimensional stress analysis. Includes dynamic analysis and field problems, such as heat transfer. Utilizes readily available finite element computer programs to solve stress analysis, heat transfer, thermal stresses, etc. P: BS in Engineering or related field.
ENGRG 7550 3 credits Product Design and Development
This course examines the front end of the product development process. Topics include: organization and management issues associated with the product development process; the identification of customer needs and the translation of these needs into product performance specifications; methodologies for the generation and selection of concepts; developing the product architecture with emphasis on creating interfaces, prototyping and design for manufacturing.
ENGRG 7800 3 credits Engineering Management
Introduce the student to fundamental concepts of management and management theories. Discuss timely topics and issues of business ethics including environmental, safety, and product liability. The student will gain an understanding of differences between engineering and management roles with specific application to motivating, and managing technical personnel. The student will develop an understanding and application of the specific tools of engineering management including basic forecasting, planning, scheduling and decision-making models.
ENGRG 7810 3 credits Advanced Production and Operations Analysis
Tools and techniques associated with planning and controlling in the production environment including forecasting, aggregate planning, master production scheduling, materials requirement planning, and shop floor control. Integrated aspects of manufacturing resource planning and enterprise resource planning as well as the effects of just-in-time management and theory of constraints.
ENGRG 7820 3 credits Quality Engineering and Management
This course provides practical tools for planning and completing quality improvement projects. The first part of the course deals with an introduction to quality management philosophies, tools, and approaches. The second part (about 70%) of the course is devoted to the Six-Sigma (SS) philosophy, roadmap, tools, and techniques of planning and executing quality improvement projects. The course concludes with the application of the Design for Six Sigma (DFSS) approach to design or improve products and processes. P: MATH 4030 or ENGRG 6050, or consent of instructor.
ENGRG 7830 3 credits Advanced Cost and Value Analysis
Introduction to the concepts of value within the manufacturing environment. Investigation of various methods of increasing value and defining value are considered. Emphasis is on creating value for the customer through application of sound economic analysis and manufacturing methods improvements. Value Engineering including function analysis. Value Stream Mapping and 5S applications are studied in the context of Lean Manufacturing methods.
ENGRG 7840 3 credits Systems Engineering Management
New technologies and time constraints need to meet the challenges of satisfying customer needs such as performance, quality, and over-all cost effectiveness. This sets up a framework for effective system engineering and management of complex systems. The systems engineering effort needs to integrate a wide variety of key design disciplines, apply robust design methods and tools in a manner as to achieve system engineering objectives, assess and control through design reviews, evaluations, feedback and corrective action. The management issues pertaining to the application of systems engineering to various projects is equally important. Principles of System Engineering Management Plan (SEMP), organizational aspects of Systems Engineering such as functional, product line, and matrix structures, and interfaces between the customer, the producer, and suppliers are some key topics that need to be addressed as part of Systems Engineering Management.
ENGRG 7850 3 credits Taguchi Method of Designing Experiments
This course will provide experience in applying Taguchi Methods for designing robust products and processes. Taguchi Methods may be considered as "cookbook" approaches to designing and analyzing industrial experiments. Students will learn to plan a project and develop strategies for experiments. Definition of controllable factors, noise factors, responses, and quality characteristics (both dynamic and static) in a project will be discussed. Applications of orthogonal arrays, signal-to-noise ratio, mean-squared deviation, loss function, ANOVA, and related topics will be covered. P: MATH 4030 or ENGRG 6050, or consent of instructor.
ENGRG 7860 3 credits Continuous Improvement with Lean Principles
Introduction to the concepts of value within the manufacturing environment. Investigation of various methods of increasing value and defining value are considered. Emphasis is on creating value for the customer through application of sound economic analysis and manufacturing methods improvements. Value Engineering including function analysis. Value Stream Mapping and 5S applications are studied in the context of Lean Manufacturing methods.
ENGRG 7930 1-3 credits Special Topics in Engineering
Various engineering topics will be explored. Topics vary.
ENGRG 7980 1-3 credits Independent Study in Engineering
Students registering for independent study must submit, at or before registration, a description and timetable for completion, signed by both the instructor supervising the independent study and the student. The project must be above and beyond the student's traditional employment requirements. This is to be a graduate level experience, conducted with graduate rigor and culminating in a document of professional quality. The maximum allowable Independent Study credits will be four (4) within the Master of Science in Engineering program and a maximum of three (3) may be taken at any one time.