Master of Engineering

http://www.uwplatt.edu/disted
Contact: Dr. Lisa A. Riedle
Program Coordinator
Master of Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Platteville
1 University Plaza
Platteville, WI 53818
Telephone: (608) 342-1686
Fax: (608) 342-1566
Email:engineering@uwplatt.edu

The Master of Engineering degree is a technical degree in engineering requiring 30 credits of advanced course work but no thesis. A need has been expressed by several major industries for the delivery of advanced technical education to be achieved without employee relocation.

In response to this need, the program includes technical areas of emphasis, and it is offered 100% online. In the technical areas of emphasis, courses are offered to satisfy the needs and requirements of a specific technical specialty. This online program makes the degree much more accessible to professionals working in industries within the state, the region and the world. Furthermore, the Internet provides opportunities to deliver information in various formats to encompass different student learning styles.

In addition to courses within a technical area of emphasis, the Master of Engineering program provides education for professional development in the areas of mathematics, technical communications, computer applications, and engineering management.

Admission Requirements for Master of Engineering

Those seeking admission to the Master of Engineering program must have earned a bachelor's degree in engineering or a related field from a nationally or regionally accredited institution recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). If the bachelor's degree is in a field other than engineering, applicants may be asked to complete prerequisite courses. Students may be contacted on an individual basis for additional information to support their admission. International degrees will be evaluated on an individual basis.

To be eligible for admission in full standing, a student must have an overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.75 or above, or 2.90 on the last 60 credits from the degree-granting institution.

Students seeking admission as a Matriculated Student should follow the instructions found on pages _____ of this catalog.

Program entrance requirements and degree completion requirements are consistent with those of the graduate programs of the institution:

Special Students:

Students who wish to enroll in selected courses without being admitted to the program may enroll as special students. Special students can go directly to online courses at the web site (http://www.uwplatt.edu/disted) to register. A maximum of 12 credits may be taken as a special student.

Curriculum

Core Requirements

One course must be taken from each of the following areas, found within Section A:

Mathematics
Computer Applications
Technical Communications
Engineering Management
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits
3 credits

Electives

Three courses (9 credits) must be completed from ONE of the two Technical Emphasis areas listed in Section B.   9 credits

Remaining credits may be taken from Sections A, B, or C.   9 credits

TOTAL
30 credits

Course Descriptions

Course Availability: Please check our web site (http://www.uwplatt.edu/disted) for course availability and registration instructions.

Section A: Core Courses

Mathematics: (Select One)

Mathematics 5230 3 credits
Linear Algebra

Matrices, systems of equations, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, vector spaces, linear transformations, and diagonalization. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2740 with a grade of "C" or better.

Mathematics 6050 3 credits
Applied Statistics

This course is a graduate level introductory course in statistics. This foundation course is designed to prepare a student for study in the Master of Engineering program or the Master of Science in Project Management program. This course will cover basic concepts of probability, discrete and continuous random variables, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, and applications of statistics including simple linear regression, multiple regression, basic design of experiments and ANOVA.

Computer Applications: (Required)

Civil and Environmental Engineering 7830 3 credits
Optimization with Engineering Applications

Students will be able to solve a variety of optimization problems using optimization software or the optimization routines available in spreadsheets (e.g. Excel or Quattro). Linear, non-linear, and discrete problems will be solved. Students will learn the theory of improving search methods, which are the basis for all optimization algorithms. An emphasis will be placed on the need for the modeler to examine the practicality of program results. Also, students will perform a Life Cycle Analysis, which is an optimization procedure that minimizes the impacts on the environment.

Technical Communications: (Select One)

Communication 5010 3 credits
Business Communication

Communication strategies and techniques used in business; practice in writing effective memos, letters and reports; oral communication skills developed in influencing group decisions and making presentations; employment correspondence and interviewing.

Communication 7330 3 credits
Organizational Communication

Horizontal and vertical communication channels in education, industry, business, and society, as well as leadership, persuasion, rumor theory, and communication networks are examined.

English 5000 3 credits
Technical Writing

Technical description and explanation, job applications, business correspondence, and reports suited to one's major (e.g., a criminal or safety investigation, feasibility study, or grant proposal); oral presentations; technical editing. Emphasis on clarity, conciseness, precision, and effective communication with lay audiences and management.

Engineering Management: (Required)

Project Management 7010 3 credits
Project Management Techniques I

Issues surrounding project scope definition; plan development and execution; sequencing, scheduling, and controlling activities for timely completion of projects; and collection and dissemination of project-related information.

Section B: Technical Emphasis Courses

Select a total of nine credits from ONE of the two technical emphasis areas.

Engineering Design:

Mechanical Engineering 6800 3 credits
Finite Element Method

Introduces the finite element method. Emphasizes beam and frame analysis, plane stress, plane strain, axisymmetric and three-dimensional stress analysis. Includes field problems, such as heat transfer. Utilizes readily available finite element computer programs to solve stress analysis, heat transfer, and other engineering related problems. P: ME3330

Mechanical Engineering 7300 3 credits
Design of Experiments

Strategy of experimentation. Some typical applications of experimental design. Basic principles of designing experiments. Guidelines for designing engineering experiments. Brief history of statistical design of experiments (DOE). Basic statistical concepts and simple comparative experiments. Experiments with a single factor and the analysis of variance (ANOVA). Checking model adequacy. The randomized complete block design (RCBD) and Latin square. Introduction to two-factor factorial designs and general factorial designs. Fractional factorial designs and confounding present in these designs. Methods of improving the resolution of the design through blocking and folding over of experiments. Response surface methods and designs. Random factors in factorial experiments, mixed models, nested designs, and split-plot designs. Taguchi approach to the design of experiments. Minitab, Design-Ease, and Qualitek-4 software will be used for solving typical problems in various industries.

Mechanical Engineering 7550 3 credits
Product Design and Development

This course examines the front end of the product development process. Topics include: organization and management issues associated with the product development process; the identification of customer needs and the translation of these needs into product performance specifications; methodologies for the generation and selection of concepts; developing the product architecture with emphasis on creating interfaces, prototyping and design for manufacturing.

Engineering 7980 1-3 credits
Independent Study in Engineering

Students registering for independent study must submit, at or before registration, a description and timetable for completion, signed by the instructor supervising the independent study. The project must be above and beyond the student's traditional employment requirements. This is to be a graduate level experience, conducted with graduate rigor and culminating in a document of professional quality. The final report must describe and summarize the project in detail; wherever feasible, graphics, figures, data, and equations are to be included.

Applications in Engineering Management:

Industrial Engineering 6030 3 credits
Production and Operations Analysis

Tools and techniques associated with planning and controlling production environment, including forecasting, aggregate planning, master production scheduling, materials requirement planning, and shop floor control. Integrated aspects of manufacturing resource planning and enterprise resource planning, as well as the effects of just-in-time management and theory of constraints are also examined.

Industrial Engineering 6830 3 credits
Cost and Value Analysis

Introduction to cost estimating and value engineering; detailed analysis of labor and materials; basic principles of accounting and forecasting; preliminary and detail methods; operation, product, project and system estimating; estimate assurance and contract considerations. Applications of engineering valuation. Basic principles of function analysis.

Industrial Engineering 7430 3 credits
Quality Engineering and Management

Perspectives on quality. Global quality. Quality awards. Quality planning. Voice of the customer and the market. Quality of products, processes, and services. Managing supplier quality. Quality system standards and implementation. Quality audits. Quantifying opportunities for quality improvement. Forming a team to make improvement. Analyzing the measurement system and quantifying gage repeatability and reproducibility. Identifying key process input variables(KPIV) and key process output variables (KPOV). Use of the seven basic quality tools to analyze the problem. Use of the seven quality planning tools. Analysis of processes and comparison of alternatives using statistical methods. Process capability indices and methods of quantifying process variation. Six sigma quality level. Quality function deployment (QFD). Failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA). Design of experiments and Taguchi methods. Statistical process control and control charts. Mistake proofing. Reliability testing and analysis. Design for six sigma. Application of Minitab 13 software for statistical analysis of quality data. Solving quality engineering problems dealing with all the above topics using Minitab. Exercises and case studies will reinforce basic concepts and provide experience in quality engineering and management.

Engineering 7980 1-3 credits
Independent Study in Engineering

Students registering for independent study must submit, at or before registration, a description and timetable for completion, signed by the instructor supervising the independent study. The project must be above and beyond the student's traditional employment requirements. This is to be a graduate level experience, conducted with graduate rigor and culminating in a document of professional quality. The final report must describe and summarize the project in detail; wherever feasible, graphics, figures, data, and equations are to be included.

Project Management 7020 3 credits
Project Management Techniques II

A sequence of project management topics regarding organizational planning, staff acquisition, and team development; quality planning, assurance and control; risk identification and control; and managing procurement of goods and services from outside the performing organization. Prerequisite: Project Management 7010.

Section C: Elective Courses

Select a total of nine credits from this section or from any of the courses in Sections A and B not previously taken.

Business Administration 5540 3 credits
Quality Management

Provides an understanding of the tools, language, and techniques used in the field of Total Quality Management (TQM). The history of the Quality movement, major tenets of the field, theorists and their philosophies, and the use of basic tools of TQM will all be covered in this course. The course focus will be project-based in a team environment.

Business Administration 5620 3 credits
Financial Management

An introduction to the finance function and financial management of the firm, including techniques of financial analysis, working capital management, capital budgeting, the acquisition and management of corporate capital, and dividend policy. Analysis of how the financial manager influences the decision-making process within the firm. Prerequisite: One year undergraduate accounting or graduate equivalent or consent of instructor.

Business Administration 6110 3 credits
Management Science

An introduction to quantitative methods used in business. Introduction to decision theory; in-depth treatment of linear programming and its applications; network and scheduling models; use of computer software in these applications is emphasized. Prerequisites: Statistics course or consent of instructor.

Business Administration 7540 3 credits
Advanced Quality Management

This course focuses on achieving quality through continuous improvement of processes, customer satisfaction, and creation of a team environment. Emphasis on major tenets of the field, systems thinking, Hoshin planning, and data collection and analysis. Prerequisite: Business Administration 3540/5540 Quality Management.

Civil and Environmental Engineering 5810 2 credits
Occupational Safety & Health for General Industry

The course will provide an introduction to the Occupational Safety and Health Act and the regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Topics such as hazard communication, fire protection, record keeping and machine guarding are covered. The course provides an overview of industrial health and safety suitable for managers, engineers, health and/or safety personnel, and hourly workers.

Civil and Environmental Engineering 5820 2 credits
Occupational Safety & Health for the Construction Industry

The course will provide an introduction to the Occupational Safety and Health Act and the regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Topics such as hazard communication, fire protection, record keeping and machine guarding are covered. The course provides an overview of the construction industry health and safety suitable for managers, engineers, health and/or safety personnel, general and subcontractors, foremen, and laborers.

Civil and Environmental Engineering 7160 3 credits
Advanced Foundation Design

This course is designed to fully prepare a student with only an introductory course in soil mechanics to analyze the bearing capacity of shallow and deep foundations, to design foundations to meet bearing capacity and settlement requirements, and to design reinforced concrete foundations, drilled shafts, and retaining walls.

Mechanical Engineering 7330 3 credits
Modern Controls

The course is divided into four modules. The first module is a review of classical design techniques for cascade compensators using the root locus and Bode plots. The second module introduces the state space, covering stability, controllability and observability. The third module illustrates the technique for designing compensators in state space, including pole placement techniques, optimal control, and state observers. The fourth module introduces digital control analysis and stability.

Mechanical Engineering 7730 3 credits
Design for Manufacturability

Introduction - Motivation for Design for Manufacturability, Product Development Realities, Designing Products for Manufacturability, Importance of Concept Architecture Optimization, Benefits of DFM; Design Philosophy - Design Considerations and Implementation, DFM Vs Design Freedom and Design Time; Concurrent Engineering - Teams, Organizational Structures, QFD, Product Architecture; Flexibility - Lean Production, Build-to-Order, Mass customization, Designing Flexible Products and Designing for Flexible Operations; Standardization - vis-a-vis parts, materials, processes; Cost Minimization - Minimizing Costs in Functions That Lead to Efficient Manufacturing; Total Cost - Measurement, Drivers, Accounting, Activity Based Costing; DFM Strategies for Product Design - Guidelines for Assembly, Fastening, Assembly Motion, Test, Standardization; Guidelines for Part Design - Part Design Guidelines, Tolerancing and Automation Guidelines; Design for Quality - Effects of Design on Quality, Quality Design Guidelines, Cumulative Effects on Product Quality, Reliability Design Guidelines and Measurement; Design for Repair and Maintenance - Guidelines, Measurement, Design for Maintenance.

Mechanical Engineering 7830 3 credits
Systems Engineering Management

Introduction - Definition and the Need for Systems Engineering, Classifications or Categories, System Engineering Concepts; The System Design Process - System Design Requirements - Development of Specifications and Design Criteria, the Design Process and Design Objectives, Selected Design Engineering Disciplines; Engineering Design Methods and Tools - CAD, CAM, CALS; Systems Architecting - Builder-Architected Systems, Other Systems - Architecting Design Review and Evaluation; System Engineering Program Planning - System Engineering Program Requirements, System Engineering Management Plan, Integration of Design Special Plans, Interfaces with Other Program Planning Activities, Management Methods / Tools, Risk Management Plan, Program Evaluation Factors; Organization for System Engineering - Developing the Organization Structure, Consumer-Product-Supplier Relationships, Organizations, and Functions, Human Resource Requirements; Supplier Evaluation, Selection, and Control - Program Requirements, Proposals and Supplier Selection, Contract Negotiations, Supplier Monitoring and Control, System Integration.